Sunday, December 28, 2014

How do you use a spy earpiece?

First of all, you need to place the loop around your neck, making sure that it is well concealed by your clothes (wearing a hoodie is usually a good option â€" although, given the average weather in your location we’d likely advise against it!). If you’re using your spy earpiece with a watch or eyeglasses instead of a loop, then you need to put on the watch/glasses (obviously).

Next, you need to insert the battery into the earpiece itself. NOTE â€" if the battery is slightly out of place, this can (and often does) negatively affect the sound quality; so do make sure that you test it thoroughly before going out.

Now, place the earpiece into your ear. According to Osanellona at Hubpages, you will probably want to get hold of a cotton bud first...

“You should remember that you always have to clean ear canals beforehand. Otherwise, the spy earpiece filter will choke up with earwax and sound will deteriorate significantly. In the worst case the spy earpiece will fail to work”.

Finally, you make a call. Put your mobile into your pocket (making sure that it is locked, so you don’t accidentally hang up or something). If all has gone according to plan, a covert communications link is now in place. Enjoy.

If this isn’t working, we’ll now troubleshoot two common problems...

If there are any lingering problems with the earpiece, then they are likely to be caused by either the battery (which may not be in place properly, or simply may need changing altogether) or the phone itself. When you do remove the battery, it is advised that you be very careful indeed. Once again, from Osanellona,

Is it Worth Buying a Cheap Two Way Radio?

It depends on what you want to do with it. Two-way radio technology is actually fairly simple. The basic mechanics of a radio don’t really change much from unit to unit, or from manufacturer to manufacturer.

Some radios may have flashier features (which you can decide for yourself if you really need) and others might have extra functions, such as the ability to switch between analogue and digital, but, to a large extent, a two way radio is a two-way radio.

A few of the features advertised (and no doubt added to the overall price) will do you no good whatsoever. For example, a radio claiming to have a range of 25-30 miles is simply lying to you. The average radio has a range of between 1 and 2 miles. Some are a little stronger that this, most are not.

Some radios advertise being waterproof or water resistant (some even come with built-in weather warnings) and, if you’re planning on using the radio in more outdoor conditions, then this is definitely a plus and worth spending money on.

Now, as for the tech itself, your radio’s power output is an important factor, but if you are only having a bit of fun, you likely wouldn’t need to go over 0.5 watts (and thus end up applying to Ofcom for a radio license). Generally, FRS (Family Radio Service) radios are cheapest and they are fine for a bit of fun, but GMRS (General Mobile Radio Service) radios, although they cost a little extra, are worth it if you need to transmit a stronger signal over a longer distance.

Other features, such as a built-in LED torch, a stopwatch, built-in alarms and/or a fancy light-up screen are only worth spending out on if you have a use in mind for them. Otherwise, it might be cheaper to simply provide torches and stopwatches to your staff if they require them. That’s a judgment call.

An emergency button, however, is always a good idea. The same is true for a ‘privacy’ function, especially if you are using your radio in an area with lots of other radio signals bouncing about.

Finally, we come to the idea of brand name. Certain products (we could name a particular headphone brand endorsed by a certain rapper, but we won’t) are all about selling the ‘in thing’ with a flashy logo, a branded image, a HUGE markup and little else to offer the customer. Radios are not this way, if you buy a trusted brand (such as Motorola), you can be assured of getting a quality product. In this instance, spending a little more for an established name can definitely pay off.

Essentially, if you want a two-way radio for business use, then it is worth spending out that little extra. However, if you only want one for hobby use, then you can pick one from the lower end of the market and not worry too much about it. Extra features are what add to the price more than anything else and it is entirely up to you to decide if you need them or not.

Do All Walkie Talkies Work Together

Mobile technology has greatly improved over the past years. However, cell phones have some inadequacy at some point. They are reliably dependent on network coverage and tend to fail in areas with poor or limited coverage. On the other hand, walkie talkies beat them to this. Do all walkie talkies work together? This is a question being asked by many users or those planning to acquire such devices. To answer this question, one will have to understand how the device works. You have to know the basics involved in operating the device. They are wireless radios that can be easily carried around. One has to understand the technology and the modalities associated with the workings of the walkie talkies. This is the best way to answer the question.

These are battery powered transceivers (it can send and receive a radio message). They operate on half-duplex channels. This implies that one device, on a single channel can transmit one signal at a time though many devices will be able to receive that signal. The radios are primarily designed for short-range communication and transmit signals directly to each other.

All walkie talkies have similar basic components that include a microphone, speaker, antenna, battery and the PTT button. All these features combine to make communication successful. These devices are designed to operate on particular radio frequencies. The United States has designated different frequencies to meet users’ needs. The public are allowed to use the Family Radio Service (FRS) and the General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS). The GMRS or FRS radios operate on the 460MHz range. The government has also set a side frequencies (the Business Band) that corporates can use (it ranges from 450 to 470MHz). Law enforcing agencies such as the police also have their own frequency so that there is no interference from public users. This is helps the agency to prevent their channels from overlapping with those of public users.

As already discussed above, the GMRS and FRS, frequencies are designated for public use. These channels overlap at particular frequencies even though radios that use such channels have several distinct differences.

The FRS radios have a fixed antenna. They are not quite powerful as their power is limited to about 0.5 watts. These features make their use limited to a small area. They are better suited to personal use as they only operate on the FRS bands.

The GMRS radios are more powerful and have a power of about 5 watts. They can also use repeaters to enhance their radio signals and thus boost their range.

There are many hybrid radios now that can be able to operate on both channels. However, only licensed operators are allowed to use the GMRS channel. This is because the GMRS walkie talkies are powerful enough to cause more interference.

Europe has restricted walkie talkies to PMR446 frequencies or those at just around 440MHz. It is illegal to use a radio operating on the PMR466 frequency on the GMRS or FRS channel. Therefore, if you are travelling from Europe to America, it is very important to make sure that your radio operates on the required frequency to avoid getting in trouble with the law.

From the discussion above, it is clear to see that their operation is restricted only by the frequency of the signal and not the brand. When one uses walkie talkies of the same brand, they are least likely to experience problems in signal transmission and reception as they are more similar in operation. However, this does not mean those using different brands will not communicate.

These radios are all about sending and receiving signals. Therefore, signals sent from one radio at a certain frequency can be received by another radio in that range.

What makes these gadgets stand out from cell phones is their simplicity. One does not need to dial any number to call, all you need to do is to push the PTT button when either reaching out to transmit or receiving a transmission. This applies regardless of the brand one has as they all have similar features as discussed earlier.

In conclusion, in more than one word, the evidence suggests that type of brand does not matter. Therefore, do all walkie talkies work together? Yes, they do.

Wednesday, December 24, 2014

meaning of Lateral Communication?

The term ‘lateral communication’ can actually mean (at least) two different things.

In the natural world, lateral communication occurs whenever a group of animals appear to exhibit a collective intelligence. For example, when a flock of birds turns at the exact same time, remaining in perfect formation, this is here. Other examples include shoals of fish acting in perfect synch, or the movements of ant colonies.

In the business world, however, the term ‘lateral communication’ denotes something else entirely. In modern business, lateral communication is all to do with hierarchy. An example of lateral communication occurs when two workers on the same level discuss ideas (e.g. a manager talking to a manager). Its opposite term, ‘diagonal communication’, occurs when communication is initiated between different levels of hierarchy (e.g. talking to your boss’ boss, or your boss talking to you).

From Wikipedia:

“The term lateral communication can be used interchangeably as horizontal communication. In his text entitled “Organizational Communication,” Michael J. Papa defines horizontal communication as “the flow of messages across functional areas at a given level of an organization” (Papa and Daniels 55). With this system people at the same level are permitted “to communicate directly without going through several levels of organization” (Papa and Daniels 55). Given this elasticity, members within an organization have an easier time with “problem solving, information sharing across different work groups, and task coordination between departments or project teams” (Papa and Daniels 56). The use of lateral or horizontal communication in the workplace “can also enhance morale and afford a means for resolving conflicts (Koehler et al., 1981) (Papa and Daniels 56).”

The pawns, on the other hand, can only converse one space at a time and only in one direction. Oh wait; I’m getting confused again!

I hope that helps you, Sarah-Jane. I am unsure as to which definition you were looking for, so I focussed on both. If you have any follow-up questions, drop me a line the usual way and I’ll try to get back to you as soon as I can.

the origin of the post is here

Sunday, December 21, 2014

Whats's a Covert Earpiece?

You might be safe in the knowledge that I bring the best headset content pieces, a number of them are my very own some of which are curated by me, when i decide to use somebody elses writing it’s because it’s important to my readership, so feel confident you are reading the very best from my industry.

A covert earpiece is a miniature earpiece worn by an individual while being effectively hidden from plain view. It operates as a radio accessory in times when a user does not want other people to know she or he is communicating with others using radio earbuds. Also known as an invisible earpiece or a surveillance earpiece, a covert earpiece is often worn by government agents, corporate security personnel, undercover law enforcement officers and corporate as well as government spies.

covert earpiece



While many occupations require the use of a radio headset for communication, a covert earpiece is primarily used in instances where communication is of an extremely private and sensitive nature. This is common in cases of private security details and surveillance projects. Sometimes people also use a covert earpiece to defraud businesses and others. Examples of such instances would include someone using an invisible earpiece to cheat on an exam or to defraud a casino by receiving remote information while playing a game.



On-air television personalities may also use a covert earpiece, which is not distracting to viewers, but allows the person to hear relevant feedback from producers and engineers in order to make sure a taping or live appearance flows smoothly. Individuals may also wear a covert earpiece when making a public speech. By doing so, the speaker can receive important cues or changes in a speech without the audience even being aware that communication is taking place between someone located behind the scenes and the individual delivering the speech.

Some covert earpieces are accompanied by a discreet microphone, which enables two-way communication. These are commonly used by security forces with a need for such communication, particularly during surveillance operations. These types of accessories are not only convenient because they feature hands-free operation, but also because they allow undercover security forces to blend in with crowds without having to use a visible walkie-talkie system of communication.

A covert earpiece does not contain any visible wires and is designed to fit inside the ear without being noticeable to the general public. Some devices are even designed to fit on a pair of eyeglasses while amplifying sound inside a person’s ear. An inductive wire is sometimes worn around the person’s neck, but is covered by clothing so as not to be discovered by onlookers. This wire is not connected to the covert earpiece, but connects to a separate radio device that helps modulate sound.

Saturday, December 20, 2014

The Dead Actor’s Studio

Imagine a young Marlon Brando starring alongside Johnny Depp, or Audrey Hepburn playing rival to Sandra Bullock as Marilyn Monroe stops by for a catty cameo.

Depending on how you look at it, this is either tantalizing ‘fantasy film making’ or else an utterly horrible, cash-in exercise in Hollywood excess. Whatever your viewpoint, it does seem likely that someone, somewhere will try this in the near future.

About three years ago, the news broke that George Lucas, the genius behind the ‘Star Wars’ merchandise (and a couple of related movies), was buying up the likeness rights to a plethora of iconic, yet deceased, leading men and famous actresses from Hollywood’s golden age. His plan? To use a concoction of existing footage, CGI and motion capture to create reasonable facsimiles of classic Hollywood stars and have them appear in future films, despite the notable handicap of being, well, dead.

Initially, it was just for one project, but it raised the prospect of other films being made, as well as a number of interesting philosophical issues.

The majority of critics reacted negatively to the notion of these ‘Franken-films’, some saying that the magic of an individual acting performance would be notably absent in the films, others upset that the actors themselves could potentially ‘star’ in projects that they may not have supported in life.

It really must be said, however, that blockbuster movies like 2009’s ‘Avatar’ and 2011’s ‘Rise of the Planet of the Apes’ already received plaudits for their use of motion capture techniques and CGI ‘acting’. It is an accepted part of modern cinema, like it or not.

Lest we forget, George Lucas’ own ‘Star Wars’ films also featured a number of purely CG characters. In our era, we are becoming very used to CG characters; even CG versions of real actors are commonplace. It really isn’t a huge leap of imagination (or available technology) to foresee deceased stars headlining blockbusters once again.

We are also living in a world that specializes in the glorification of deceased idols and recycled imagery (take a look at this month’s music magazines and count how many times you see Jimi Hendrix, Kurt Cobain or other dead stars on the covers). Look at the movie magazines as they feature young DeNiro as Travis Bickle, or Ray Liotta as Henry Hill. We, as consumers, are being conditioned to expect our stars to be able to do anything we can imagine, including coming back from the dead.

Why we want it:

The question here, to at least some degree, is ‘do we want it?’ but for now, I’m going to be positive and assume that we do...

Bringing classic actors back to ‘life’ would be a daring and controversial decision and would inspire all kinds of debates. It would also, no doubt, stimulate the film industry by providing literally hundreds of thousands of new prospects, pairings and casting choices.

On the downside, it would probably create an updated version of the old Hollywood studio system that would likely prove to be a legal nightmare involving no small amount of heartache for the families of the stars being featured. It could also have the negative effect of holding down upcoming talent.

However, many Hollywood actors do what they do for a shot at immortality and this is, frankly, the closest that they are likely to get to that goal. It would not surprise me at all if ‘likeness rights’ contracts started containing an ‘after death’ clause that specified use of the actor’s image in posthumous film projects.

Culturally speaking, in a worldwhere dead musicians like Hendrix and 2Pac routinely release albums and where popular music is dominated by the ‘sampling’ (and in some cases, outright theft) of other works, or where film texts constantly, almost obsessive-compulsively, reference each other (in whantat has become the intertextual equivalent of an M.C Escher drawing), rehashing the stars of the past seems like an obvious choice.

Dead icons could spice up Hollywood by adding controversy, class and bankability to the summer’s contrived blockbuster selection. Plus, all their skeletons, secrets and shameful actions are already a matter of public record, so there’s no ill-timed revelatory ‘gossip’ that’s going to rear up and threaten the production.

Even those who oppose the making of such movies will still have to watch them in order to write the requisite bad reviews, this simply proves the old adage that controversy generates cash.

When can we expect it?

Oh snap, it already happened. In the year 2000, actor Oliver Reed sadly died during the filming of Ridley Scott’s ‘Gladiator’. In order for him to finish what would become his final role, the VFX team created a CG ‘mask’ of Reed’s face and used a body double to complete their film.

Remember that car advert with Steve McQueen? It has already begun.

Real, workable CGI stars are already a reality, but the technology does not yet exist to create a completely CG James Dean for a sequel to ‘Rebel Without a Cause’. I’d give it maybe 10-20 years before we start seeing the stars in respectful, tasteful cameo roles, or else old actors performing alongside their younger selves. After that, it’ll be 3-5 years before we see the screen idols like Errol Flynn, Clark Gable and Grace Kelly headlining movies again.

Cool factor 3/5 â€" It really depends on how these ‘stars’ are handled. The results could, potentially, be beautiful codas to a star’s career (which is how they could be sold to the audience), but they could also be horribly insulting, denigrating the work of great actors and actresses. Time is going to tell, as usual...

Want to locate the original piece look here

Thursday, December 18, 2014

Should I Get a Two-Way Radio System for my Business and, if so, What Type of 2 Way Radio is Best??

It depends on what you want to use them for. A lot of two-way radios are designed with specific tasks/uses in mind, so it depends greatly on what you need them to do.

If your application is largely workplace-orientated, then a two-way business radio will likely work best. A good all-rounder, two way business radios (available from any manufacturer), can be used for increasing safety and security levels, relaying messages and services to clients quickly and efficiently, improving employee communication and much more besides.

In addition, modern radio systems are highly customizable, that way they can better suit your business needs. You can tailor them to your workforce, customer-base, or working environment. The following is taken from IcomUK.co.uk,

“Two-way business radio is a very flexible form of communication. It can provide simple one to one communication between a small group of users or increase the number of channels so you could have one channel for everyone, one channel for management, one channel for security, one channel for cleaning and so on. You can use each channel like an intercom system that lets you call individual people or groups instead of broadcasting a message to everyone. Some radios have scanning capability so your radios will only pick up conversation for the channels you have programmed. Dependent on your needs you can build a complex radio system integrating not just radio communication but security monitoring via GPS or CCTV or coverage between groups over a wide geographical area using the internet”.

Two-way radios are also exceptionally easy to use. Training your staff to use them takes almost no time at all and their user-friendliness is a great ‘plus point’ during emergency situations.

Two way radios are also far better suited for business use than mobile phones. This list is also taken from the Icom site.

business 2 way radioWhen you want to call someone on a mobile phone at a minimum you have to press a speed dial button and wait for connection. Between the dialing and the time delay of the person on the other end answering, some time can go by (if they answer at all). With a two-way radio you simply press a button and start talking. In an emergency situation, this speed could be critical.

You can talk to multiple users at once.

2wayradionline.co.uk provides radios with no monthly contract. You never have to worry about exceeding your allotted time like you would do with a mobile phone.

Icom radios are built to military specification which means that they will work in wet environment or even after they are dropped on concrete. Most mobile phone are not built to this standard.

Two way radios continue to work in natural disasters or major security incidents. Even if mobile phones do work, the mobile phone tower can get overloaded with everyone trying to make calls so your call may not go through.

Two way radios stay on site at the end of the day so can be used by shift or night workers.

There may be places in your business where mobile phones don’t work. Two way radios can reach all areas of your business, when repeaters are installed.

Two-way radios that are designed for business purposes are probably your best option (in this instance, at least). Depending on the size and scale of your business, it may be wise to hire a professional to help you set up your network.

SOURCES

http://www.icomuk.co.uk/Two_Way_Business_Radio_Buyers_Guide

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

What Walkie Talkie Is Best For A Cruise?

Yes, two-way radios DO work on cruise ships. However, because the same channels tend to be a bit overused, passengers can expect a fair amount of chatter and signal interference when using their radios.

Here’s some advice from a Woot.com user,

“I suppose the two way radios/walkie talkies would be the best option. But, how important is being in constant communication with the rest of your family anyway? A ship, while large, isn't huge. If you know the general area where people will be, you could walk over and find them. Preset arranged meeting times and places would work as well. People were able to get along fairly well without being able to directly communicate with each other at every moment of the day”.

So, aside from the option of setting pre-arranged meeting times, a radio isn’t a terrible idea, especially if you have kids. Many people reading this might simply ask why they can’t use their mobile phones. That is a very good question, after all...

If you’re going on a cruise this summer (or anytime, really), you need to be aware that your mobile phone is going to cause some problems.

 

Many cruise passengers are unaware and/or totally ill prepared for this fact and the cruise companies themselves are at least partly to blame for the lack of information in this area.

So, will your mobile phone work at sea? To answer this, let’s take a look at the following excerpt from the website ‘Cellular Abroad.com...

“The answer is most often always “You can subscribe to our cruise line cell phone network.” What they won’t tell you is the rates you will be paying. You certainly won’t be able to find them online, and to get a proper answer, you’ll have to call the cruise line to get a full break down of what they charge for access to their cell networks. As a company that sets their own international calling rates for the Talk Abroad SIM Card, we can see the cruise ship networks in our list, and it does not look good. If you subscribe to their network, you’ll be paying anything from $4 ~ $8 per minute, depending on your location and who you are calling. Don’t forget also that they’ll be charging you for receiving inbound calls”.

As we’ll soon see, taking a mobile phone on a cruise can represent a logistical nightmare. At the same time, however, many of us feel naked without a phone?

More problems are presented in the form of scheduled stops (although these can also represent opportunities for a higher â€" and cheaper â€" level of connectivity). To return to Cellular Abroad,

“If the ship is close to the coastline, and has multiple port of call stops, you’ll typically be able to get a terrestrial signal from the nearest land cell phone tower â€" up to a mile from the coast. It’s highly unlikely that you will be connected with 3G speed signals, as evidenced in my previous blog, you will need to have a low-wave 3G frequency like 800 or 900 Mhz â€" frequencies not typically associated with phones manufactured for North American consumers. So what can be done? You can rent an international cell phone that works in port, and a short way out to sea. If you really must stay connected on your boat, get in touch with your cruise travel agency and request information about the on-board cell phone rates and subscription fees”. 

So, using mobile phones on a cruise is both difficult and supremely costly, but arranging a meeting time is also likely to cause more than a few headaches. Two way radios have their problems, but may in fact be the best way to keep in contact, depending, of course, on how important a factor this is for you.

SOURCES:

http://www.cellularabroad.com/blog/do-cell-phones-work-on-cruise-ships-2

http://www.cruisereviews.com/forum/royal-caribbean-cruise-line/12108-we-lose-our-children-regularly-do-two-way-radios-work-onboard.html#b

http://deals.woot.com/questions/details/83b01dc9-9318-4de4-9a2b-f16c18761de7/whats-the-best-way-to-communicate-with-others-on-a-cruise-ship

Monday, December 15, 2014

Have You Tried the Kenwood Radio Earpiece?

You might have heard about the Kenwood radio which is the second most popular gadget in the world. As we watch communication systems surrendering to technology’s prodigies, businesses around the world expand. Various sectors of profession that rely on radio technology can actively communicate without facing any hassles. Kenwood is a renowned brand for producing reliable communication equipments. The Kenwood radio earpiece is no exception, being an ideal preference for this particular audio device. The fundamental kinds of ear pieces used for this kind of radio are the 2 pin and multi-pin connectors. Offering exceptional performance within a reliable framework, customers have shifted to using such models for increased audibility.

Key Features of Kenwood Radio Earpiece

The earpiece offers a clear and discrete source that makes communication easier. Composed of high impact polycarbonate plastic, the earpiece allows individuals to communicate in the noisiest environments. Kenwood radio earpieces therefore are considered to be the best choice that is compatible with the radio device. It is the perfect choice of equipment used for communication by security experts, door staff, and surveillance teams. The 2-pin model features two connector pins whereas the multi-pin model features various connectors. A good example of the multi-pin model is the Kenwood 3 wire earpiece that features has been fabricated into a three wire system design.

kenwood earpiece

The Kenwood earpiece comprises of a 'push to talk' or PTT button which is basically the controller of the device. It allows individuals to rapidly get in touch with clients, associates or team members to discuss and carry out various tasks. The coordination of two way radios with the right earpiece ensures excellent sound quality. One of the key features of the 2 wire earpiece is that it can be attached to a collar, lapel or a tie and slipped inside the clothing easily. The Kenwood 3 wire earpiece is slightly different since it is held in the hand to regulate operation instead of being mounted on the lapel or collar. The PTT allows the recipient to switch on or off the earpiece to relay information across.

Benefits of Buying Kenwood Earpiece

Coordinate the responses of your team at office using the Kenwood earpiece device that has been introduced by a reputable company which has existed since 1946. Attaining years of trust from clients, everyone knows how beneficial the Kenwood radio earpiece is! The ear bud has been fabricated with the idea of giving comfort to the listeners with a fitting frame. The cable of the earpiece is transparent, lightweight and durable with hardwearing. The sound quality is excellent of the earpiece that comes alongside a built-in microphone. Aligned with a clothing clip both the devices feature a surveillance tube and the PTT button.

You can easily replace the plastic clothing clip with a steel clip and add features like swivel ear loop. This is done so as to improve flexibility of usage and comfort. Irrespective of how the environment is, the earpiece has a noise cancelling feature that makes it efficient to use in social events at nightclubs, factor or a public event. It is the choice made by professionals since the device is highly compatible with Kenwood 2 way radios. Imagine days when your communication systems are on a shutdown with extreme interference in sound waves! If you fancy a noise free, discrete and clear sound quality then Kenwood radio earpieces is the ideal pick.

A Kenwood radio customer will never face the problem of compatibility or affordability. Having distinct features makes the earpiece an accommodating communication tool. There are lower priced devices available however lack the durability of Kenwood. The Kenwood earpiece is composed of robust framework that can withstand collision. In fact the earpiece is resistant to high strain making it a long lasting device. The earpiece has been recognized globally to being an apt choice for enhancing sound quality of Kenwood radios. You should ensure that while you’re out buying earpiece for yourself, the kind of radio you have matters a lot. So choose wisely before making a final decision.

Conclusion

Kenwood radio earpiece is a result of proficient technology that assists receiving, sending and regulating information between recipients. It is vital to use competent communication tools to achieve quality proof sound. Kenwood is an economical brand that triggers consistent performance over time. This lightweight device couples with a resilient covering that secures prolonged connectivity. Enjoy the comfort of uninterrupted conversations with Kenwood’s brilliant earpiece technology today.

Saturday, December 13, 2014

On the Air, Within The Air Radio and Air Travel, an inseparable Mix

Radios are a Vital Tool for Air Travel. At London Heathrow airport, for example, three hundred companies employ some 80,000 people every day, whilst 65 million people leave from, arrive at, or pass through the airport. In the face of such staggering humanity, fast, efficient communication becomes paramount.

Medical personnel need to be notified quickly in case of an accident. Security guards must be able to respond and react to any potential threat as swiftly as possible. Other, daily issues such as reuniting lost children with their parents, locating missing luggage and the inspection of imported goods, must also be dealt with in a clear and professional manner.



Without a reliable network of two-way radios, the entire daily operation of any airport would be next to impossible.

Today, most modern airports have switched from having individual radio networks specific to each company, to the employment of more integrated solutions. In 2000, the engineering firm Arup was employed by BAA to make these changes possible at Heathrow, specifically in Terminal 5. According to the firm’s official website,

“Previously at Heathrow, individual mobile operators had installed their own infrastructure, resulting in duplication and proliferation of infrastructure across the airport, standards of installation that varied, unreliable records, and unsightly clutter to the terminal landscape”.

Eventually, the site continues,

“It was jointly agreed by BAA and Arup that the most appropriate solution for the new terminal was common infrastructure that could be shared by multiple parties”.

The changes at Terminal 5 proved to be a success. These days, most airports follow this model of radio communication. The benefits are enormous. Airports are running smoother than ever thanks to improved cross communication between individuals and departments (everything from catering, flight and cabin crew to cleaning staff, border controls and freight handling).



Two-way radios are superior to mobile phones for these tasks because they are instant. Also, there are very few lapses in signal and they are sturdy enough for use in almost any environment.

Think of your mobile: if you came upon an accident right now and you wanted to call somebody and report it, you would be dependent on a multitude of factors, wouldn’t you? Do you have signal? Do you have credit? Will they even pick up the phone at their end? However, a two-way radio eliminates most of these problems. The operator simply presses the button to talk and awaits the reply. Easy.

Two-way radios cover a large area, can be used on secure channels and are cost effective solutions to communications challenges presented by organizations such as Heathrow.

The benefits of a two-way radio system have been well known for a long time, it is a system used by police, the armed forces, building contractors, security firms and, of course, cab drivers, the world over. Plus, the technology isn’t upgraded too often, so there’s not much risk of your purchase becoming obsolete by the time you put down your deposit.

In a very real sense, airports would struggle to complete one outgoing flight a day without two-way radio technology.

you can obtain the original piece here

Monday, December 8, 2014

VTech Innolab: The Kids Are Alright

Last night I found myself in the grip of a nightmare. In my dream, a Woman dressed like a Victorian widow was drowning me under a sheet of thick, impenetrable ice. Before that, I’d had a series of other nightmares involving a fire, a group of shadow-like stick figures slashing me with long nails and an attack by large tanks aimed at either shooting me or squashing me, whichever came first.

However, in a lucid state of dreaming, I was able to call on a ‘Dream Guardian’ of sorts, who furnished me with a magical suit of armour that allowed me to beat all of the challenges. I ‘burst’ the spindly shadow-men with a blast of light, I doused the fire with water, and I disabled the tanks with a single punch.

Yep, imagination is a powerful thing.



That’s what worries me about tablets for kids. When I was a little boy, we played Sega Mega Drive, but I also had a leftover 70’s Pocket Simon that I adored. Mostly however, it was playing with toys that allowed me to foster and develop the natural imagination that I now use every day in my other life as a contemporary fiction writer.

I immersed myself in comics, books and ghost stories and, in the process, found a career path that felt right to me (although, looking back, I probably should have paid attention in maths and been a banker).

Today’s kids, growing up with tablet PCs, video games and blockbuster movies, may not have as much need for an imagination, or at least, that’s what sometimes bothers me. I worry that kids who grow up with ‘interactive literature’ at their disposal, might become deathly bored with ‘grown up’ literature when they come of age, and that they might even grow to reject the printed word outright. Not only does ‘Crime & Punishment’ not have pictures, but the only options for playable mini games would have to be desperately macabre.

Pedantic and repetitive explanations don’t necessarily teach children to use computers, either. Anybody can do anything if they have someone telling them over and over again how to do it. So, with more and more interactive toys and less and less cause to take up a cardboard box and ‘just add wonder’, it is easy to play a prophet of doom to a predicted generation of mindless kids, most of whom don’t know how to actually be kids anymore.

However, in my capacity as a tech reviewer, I’ve found considerable cause to hope for better. After extensively reviewing the latest crop of kid’s tablet PCs, I’ve actually found them to be, potentially, an exceptionally useful learning tool. In fact, provided that they are used as part of a ‘balanced diet’ (that also includes traditional picture books, regular play and stimulating creative exercises), a children’s tablet can be a really enriching product.

With literally hundreds of apps available for cheap download, kids tablets can offer anything from reading and writing programs, to maths, elementary science and even foreign languages. The sheer variety available on tablets like the VTech Innolab or the Leapfrog LeapPad is actually amazing. Some of these tablets (such as the LeapPad) even have specially designed operating systems that give children a basic introduction to the underpinnings of MAC OS, Windows, or Android.

In fact, there’s a lot to be said for interactive activities being better than more enriching than ‘passive’ activities like watching TV. Of course, there will be those parents who don’t take the time to use the tablets with their children, but those parents are no different from those who use the TV as an all-purpose babysitter or those parents who never make the time to read to their children.

However, if you want your child to gain a basic grasp of computers and have access to an array of interactive learning facilities, then I can honestly say that you could do a lot worse than getting a kid’s tablet.

In moderation a children’s tablet can be a passport to excitement, adventure and a high degree of preschool learning. Remember though, I said moderation. Drawing, writing, reading and traditional play are still very much number one in my opinion.

After all, without a little imagination, the adult world can be one nightmare after another.

Saturday, December 6, 2014

Tech We’d Just Like for you to See: Cities around the Moon

Placing a city (or several) on the moon has long been a dream of science fiction writers, futurists and ambitious scientists. Recently however, renewed public interest in space exploration, together with a growing realization that the world is becoming dangerously overpopulated, has lead some scientists, artists and zealous would-be lunar colonists to start taking this ages-old dream extremely seriously.

Why we want it:

Because it could potentially be one of the only non-genocidal solutions to the eventual overpopulation of planet earth. Also, who wouldn’t want to sit on the moon and watch the Earth rise?

When can we expect it?



A couple of years ago, a group called Moon Capital launched a high profile competition, allowing scientists, architects and aspiring artists the chance to create scientifically plausible scenes of moon colonisation (in the style made famous by super-artist Chesley Bonestell).



The competition had (hypothetical) moon colonisation taking place in the year 2068. This estimate was good enough for the entrants of the competition, so it’ll be good enough for us, too. Hopefully, then, you’ll get your lunar colony in about 55 years time (just under a hundred years after Neil Armstrong took that one small step....)

Of course, the problems posed by such a feat of engineering are many-fold. For starters, the moon is some 380,000 km away from us at any given time, (which is quite a trip for a moving van, even taking speed cameras out of the equation), then there’s the difficulty of actually building a working city in such a hostile environment...

We’ve built space stations, of course, so we know we can construct things in space, but they aren’t exactly desirable places to live. Also, we can get people to the moon and back (we’ve been at it since the 60’s, no matter what the conspiracy nuts tell you), but the trip is still intensely dangerous and requires a great deal of training and preparation.

Finally, we come to the complete lack of breathable atmosphere on the moon; this would require scientists to create some sort of artificial environment (or else speed up development of terraforming methods, but that’s a story for another time).

Oh yeah, there’s no food either, not unless you like your Selenite steaks rare.

Yes, the idea of colonising the moon poses a number of mind-boggling obstacles, but if there’s one thing that we as a species excel at, its overcoming obstacles.

So, while it may seem far-fetched to imagine something like this actually happening, consider this; the first powered flight took place in 1903 and just 66 years later, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin were hanging out on the moon. Think on that for a second.

Cool Factor: 5/5

Cities on the moon? Now that’s cool.

Want to locate the original post have a look here

Thursday, December 4, 2014

Koudounaris’ book, ‘Heavenly Bodies’ is out there immediately.

Paul Koudounaris, who’s also known by his nickname ‘Indiana Bones’ is an writer, photographer and principal specialist on bone-decorated sites and ossuarys. Earlier in 2013, Koudounaris published a hardback that includes hd images of the 400-year-old ‘catacomb saints’ of Rome, a bunch of corpses that had been carefully adorned with charms and finery prior to being presented as remnants of saints to congregations around Europe.

Through the Protestant Reorganization of the 16th Century, Catholic churches were routinely stripped of their relics, symbols and finery. So they can counter this, The Vatican had very old skeletons removed out of the Catacombs of Rome and generously decorated as the remnants of recognizable saints.

Even though regularly forgotten until Koudounaris released his book, the catacomb saints still fascinate concerned parties; they may still encourage religious zeal. In 1977, the township of Ruttenbach in Bavaria worked hard to gain enough money to buy back two of their primary saints from undisclosed collectors, the decorative skeletons had originally been auctioned off in 1803.

The book, which Koudounaris has surreptitiously titled ‘Heavenly Bodies’ sees its author attempt to find and photograph each of these surviving crypt saints.

In his prime (a period that lasted over 200 years before decisively coming to a close in the nineteenth century), the saints travelled far and wide, being transported at great expense by the Church. They were venerated as things of devotion, or conduits for prayer.

However the saints may seem strange to contemporary eyes (one Telegraph reporter described these as ‘ghastly’), it is important to remember that those who prayed at the feet of those gilded cadavers were a great deal closer to demise than their contemporary counterparts. Within the wake of The Black Death (which recurred repeatedly right through Europe from the 14th to the 17th Centuries), art, literature and worship had come to accept such ghoulish, macabre images.

The remains were regularly garlanded by nuns and often placed in a choice of realistic poses, before being secured in glass cabinets. Some of the scrupulous decoration took as long as 5 years to finish, with jewellery and costumes being exceptionally grand.

Koudounaris’ book, ‘Heavenly Bodies’ is out there now.

you can find more info from this place here

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

DMR Tier III: the open standard for radio communications

So i found this article on the internet and i was told that just posting it as the whole piece is not a good thing, I got consent from the original author and read up how to curate articles, so this is it…….i thought this was fascinating because it highlights some of the highs and lows that I encountered when i was working within the business.


Private mobile radio is fast becoming an essential communications solution to support the operational needs of utilities companies, airports, oil and gas pipelines and emergency services.


When compared to public cellular services, it delivers improved coverage, reliability and resistance, contention, security, group communications and performance.


The digital landscape is crowded, though, with a number of public safety digital standards such as TETRA, P25 as well as low cost digital solutions including DMR (Digital Mobile Radio), dPMR (digital Private Mobile Radio), NXDN and PDT (Professional Digital Trunking).


DMR is coming out on top thanks to the open standard nature of DMR Tier III trunking, which is driving its emergence, ongoing development and adoption across global markets.


But do open standards matter? While open standards are less important in the small system market, they are critical to the long-term case for the radio system in the medium to large systems sector, and it is here that open standard DMR Tier III will dominate.


Essentially, DMR Tier III trunking features a control channel on each radio site and allocates traffic channels on demand making it frequency efficient and enabling a large number of users to share a relatively small number of channels. Radio sites can easily be inter-connected, usually using IP connections, making it possible to deploy systems ranging from a single site to hundreds of sites spread over a large geographical area.


The open standard way


The DMR standard includes the facility for implementers to provide ‘manufacturer extensions’, enabling manufacturers to provide proprietary features within the framework of the DMR air interface definition. This allows them to complement the standard set of DMR call functions with their specific facilities.


This has the advantage of enabling customers to request specific functionalities to support the manufacturer’s business operation needs and also enables them to provide innovative features that differentiate their solutions from others implementing the same standard.


One disadvantage to this offering is that interoperability can only be possible for those features that are fully defined by the standard and that customers using manufacturer extensions are effectively locked in to a single manufacturer solution rather than enjoying the vendor choice that a standard enables.


To address the pros and cons, the DMR Association (DMRA) has struck a balance between robustness and cost with their interoperability process, which focuses on testing the conformance of products against the published standard that describes the over-air signalling. The DMRA facilitates testing between a terminal manufacturer and an infrastructure manufacturer, and the two parties carry out the testing against a standard test specification. Test results and logs of all messages sent over air are recorded during the testing and then are inspected by one or more independent third parties during a detailed review meeting. Only after the independent third parties are satisfied that the equipment under test has conformed to the open standard specification is an interoperability certificate issued.


Ongoing standards development


Whilst this facility can be useful, extensive use of manufacturer extensions would call into question whether DMR was a standard that delivers interoperability (and therefore vendor choice) or whether it results in proprietary solutions rather than following an open standard.


The answer to this lies in the work of the DMR Association. The DMRA has a technical working group – made up of competing manufacturers – who collaborate to ensure the standard succeeds. Any proprietary features from the manufacturers, which are believed to have wide market appeal or have useful features the standard doesn’t yet specify, are debated in the group. They are then developed to further advance the standard to the benefit all of the manufacturers and indeed the customers who choose to implement DMR technology.


The DMRA is further developing the standard to meet future market demands by identifying important new features and ensuring these are developed and included in new releases of the ETSI standards.


The future of DMR Tier III


Open standards are critical to providing long-term support and stability to customers. The adoption of the standard by a critical mass ensures its longevity over other similar competing technologies that have lower levels of support by offering the market vendor choice and maintaining low costs.


Is DMR Tier III radio communications’ open standard for the future? Yes. Due to DMRA’s authority, the robust and well-supported interoperability programme and the long-term commitment of a large number of manufacturers, it is emerging as the most successful low cost digital technology for complex projects – and therefore the open standard that no other private mobile radios can contend with.


Source – http://www.telecomstechnews.com/news/2014/apr/25/dmr-tier-iii-open-standard-radio-communications/


Sunday, July 20, 2014

IED blast in Afghanistan inspires ex-Green Beret to reinvent two-way radio

Article of the Day………ok so i don’t have an article each day, but if i get a chance I’ll post articles that I find interesting. Fortunate enough here is one of these articles that I read and needed to share. Should you enjoy it as much as me, please add one of the special social media likes, you know the one which tells everybody you loved something, rather than you sat on your arse and watched Television!


U.S. Army Special Forces Sgt. Tom Katis was headed through the mountains from Asadabad to Jalalabad in Northeastern Afghanistan to catch a plane out of the country for a week of leave in January 2003 when 70 pounds of plastic explosives buried in the road detonated directly under the lead vehicle in his convoy, setting off an ambush.


Shooting erupted from the reeds along the Kunar River, and Katis found his crew switching among numerous radio channels to call in air support and a medical helicopter for two wounded soldiers, as well as to update his commander and coordinate with nearby units.


Tom Katis


“I had to take guys off team frequencies to monitor empty traffic. All of a sudden, the team was not on the same frequency,” said Katis. “We all had radios that cost $15,000 each, and we’re yelling at each other.”


At that moment, Katis decided that even when operating as designed, radios were too difficult to use in combat. Live-only microphones caused missed connections. Choices had to be made quickly between satellite and line-of-sight systems.


That trauma was the kernel for Voxer, a San Francisco-based “push-to-talk” smartphone application developer that Katis co-founded in 2007 and hopes will take a big chunk of the multi-billion-dollar two-way radio hardware and services industry.


After finishing his second Army tour in 2003, Katis immediately co-founded a private security firm called Triple Canopy that has grown to 8,000 employees by catering to military, government and corporate customers around the world.


The radio idea stuck with Katis, however, who had worked a stint at a startup in Silicon Valley from 1999 to 2001.


“The first thing that was obvious was that everything needed to go on the Internet,” said Katis, a graduate of Yale University with a bachelor’s degree in ethics, politics and economics who interrupted his business career to re-enroll in the military after the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks.


At Triple Canopy, Katis in 2004 met Matt Ranney, who became Voxer’s co-founder and CTO. What they and early Voxer employees later created was an Internet-based hybrid between a walkie-talkie and a group messaging application that enables users to talk live or send voice, text and photo messages that can be retrieved at will, all while displaying individual users’ locations. Venture investors to date have funded their efforts with $30 million.


It’s a deceptively simple system, according to Gartner, but Voxer has received 126 patents around the world to protect its inventions, which Katis says provide a platform for significantly improving communications in the private sector and government.


In May 2011, Voxer released a free version of its app and, though it was initially slow to catch on, it exploded to nearly 70 million users by 2012.


At that point Voxer had to choose whether to focus on the consumer app and generate money through advertising or some other vehicle — a vision that many other entrepreneurs were chasing — or try to build a communications product that businesses and governments would be willing to buy. For Katis and his cohorts, the choice was clear.


“A free consumer app was not going to solve the problems we want to solve,” said Katis in an interview in Voxer’s San Francisco headquarters in the historic Phelan Building on Market Street. “I think I can build a much bigger company than that. This is a hundred-billion-dollar industry that I think we can go and take a very meaningful piece of.”


Katis still loves and intends to keep the free app, but Voxer turned its attentions to building more sophisticated features, including encryption, a web-browser-based version for administrators, an installed appliance that companies or government agencies (think three letters) can run themselves and a function that mimics the way two-way radios squawk out transmissions in real-time.


Voxer launched a roughly $10-a-month-per-user business version in June 2013 and, while Katis says the first year was very much a learning process concerning how to make corporate sales, the company just scored its biggest customer yet, the North American division of a major international automobile manufacturer, the identity of which it cannot yet make public. In addition, Roto-Rooter, the national plumbing repair business, in April started to roll Voxer out to about 900 people, a quarter of its field staff, and Voxer has trials underway with various U.S. agencies.


Most of the sales to date have been to companies that asked to upgrade from the free app, said Katis, adding that the company is now hiring in sales and marketing.


One inbound customer was Chris Marino, owner of Xtreme Snow Pros, a snow removal service in Mahwah, N.J., who used the business version last winter for the first time after testing out many different two-way radio systems. Most of the other systems required hardware purchases were more expensive and less versatile, he said.


Marino’s staff balloons during snow season from five to 70 employees with seasonal help, and Voxer lets him communicate with each one individually or all at once from his desk.


“Voxer Business was an incredible asset to us,” Marino said. “It’s a truly great product.”


 


Sunday, July 13, 2014

Some Of The Greatest Canadian Inventions Of All Time

Throughout history, there has been several earth shaking inventions made by Canadians. Thanks to these brilliant men and women, our lives have been made much easier through tools, games, equipments and medication invented by these great people. Discussed below are some of the greatest Canadian inventions in no particular order.


Invention of Insulin


Insulin was invented in the winter of 1921 and the spring of 1922 by a scientist called Dr Frederick Banting and his assistant known as Charles Best. Through numerous tests and trials followed by sleepless nights, these two great men permanently changed how diabetes was being treated, giving hope and good health to diabetics all over the world. Without any shred of doubt, this invention does stand out.


The Telephone


This invention changed the world forever, it opened up the entire globe to all and sundry. Alexander Graham Bell and his loyal assistant, Watson invented this earth shaking communication media in 1876. This device has and continues to form the basis of various communication concepts. It is almost unthinkable to imagine how far behind the entire world would be if the great Alexander Graham Bell had not made this invention. We congratulate another great Canadian inventor!


The Invention of the Pacemaker


If you are suffering from a heart ailment or know anyone with a heart problem then you are bound to appreciate the impact of the Pacemaker in the medical fraternity. In 1950, Mr. John Hopps an electric engineer put forward his theory that a heart that was unable to continue working could be jolted back to life again. From this theory, the Pacemaker was developed. Together with John Callaghan and Widred Bigelow a cardio- thoracic surgeon at the Toronto General Hospital they designed an external device that used the then new Vacuum tube technology to provide the required transcutaneous pacing. The initial pacemaker has since been greatly improved as it was a tad crude and because it was powered by an AC wall socket it could accidentally electrocute the patient.


The Java Programming Language


Java is a computer programming language that is object oriented, class based and concurrent. Its working mantra is to allow programmers or code writers to Write Once, Run Anywhere (WORA), this implies that code written for one platform can be run on another platform without recompiling. A Canadian, James Arthur Gosling with two of his colleagues, Patrick Naughton and Mike Sheridan initiated this language in 1991; the language was initially known as ‘oak’, in reference to a tree outside Goslings office. It was later called ‘Green’ before settling for the name ‘Java’ after the popular java coffee. The language was initially designed for interactive television; it currently remains a de facto standard that is controlled through the transparent and open Java Community Process. It was released as free and open source software (FOSS) on November 13th 2006.


Basketball


Way back in December of 1891, Dr. James Naismith, a Canadian working in the US as a physical education professor at the International YMCA training school in Springfield Massachusetts , currently the Springfield College thought of a way of keeping his class fully occupied and physically fit through an indoor game during the long winter periods. He went ahead to set the rules and went ahead to nail a peach basket onto an elevated track that measured 10 foot. The game was initially played with a soccer ball and the peach basket retained its bottom, calling for manual retrieval after every point was scored. This was found to be inefficient and the bottom was later removed. The peach baskets were used for over 14 years before being replaced by backboards and metal hoops in 1906. This is one of the greatest Canadian inventions without a doubt.


Saturday, July 5, 2014

Riedel to Provide Radio Communications Network and Equipment for Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games

This was originally posted on this site and we thought we’d share it here, Riedel are one of the worlds biggest radio companies and have run the communications for the london olympics, euros 2012 and many other big events, so thsi story comes as no surprise.


Riedel Communications, provider of pioneering real-time video, audio, data, and communications networks, will supply all radio communications equipment and services for the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games, running from July 23 to Aug. 3 in Glasgow, Scotland. 


“The ability to communicate effectively at Games venues and throughout Glasgow and other parts of Scotland is an essential element to delivering a successful Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games,” said Brian Nourse, chief information officer, Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games. “We have benefited from Riedel’s extensive experience of being involved in many previous major sporting events to ensure a robust communications solution is delivered for our event,” 


 Riedel Communications has designed a radio communications solution for use across Glasgow and at the 14 venues hosting 17 different sporting competitions. The company is providing all radio handsets and radio communication accessories — including more than 6,000 radios — used in the lead-up to and during the Games, along with a terrestrial trunked radio (TETRA) digital network and a Motorola MOTOTRBO digital radio repeater system. Both the TETRA and MOTOTRBO systems are dedicated, fully monitored, and serviced solutions. 

TETRA combines the advantages of analog trunked radio with those of digital mobile radio to provide optimal frequency usage, high transmission quality for speech and data, maximum security against eavesdropping, as well as flexible networking and connection management. Beyond that, the digital trunked radio system supports full duplex communication, GPS-positioning, and connection to the public telephone network. The system offers the option of operating different virtual channels, and it can leverage IP connectivity to support wide-area operation.

With this communications infrastructure, Riedel will ensure outdoor street-level coverage at all official venues, throughout the city of Glasgow, and along the official cycling road race and marathon routes, as well as indoor coverage at Glasgow 2014 competition venues. Riedel is also supplying the radio communications solution for the Scottish leg of the Queen’s Baton Relay, ensuring radio communications run smoothly as the baton makes its way through Scotland to Glasgow for the Games.

“We are delighted to be the Official Radio Communications Partner of the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games,” said Christian Bockskopf, head of marketing for Riedel Communications. “We’ve worked closely with the organizers to develop a radio communications solution that satisfies both the technical and operational requirements of all the key players during this world-class event.”

 


Wednesday, July 2, 2014

Earpieceonline Explain What Are The Different Types Of Earpiece?

An earpiece allows security professional to communicate in a covert manner without anyone noticing. Earpieces are important to allow communication between the wearer and his/ her team discreetly. There are many earpiece models and makes that a security agent can wear but typically, earpieces are of two major categories i.e. wireless and wired. Within these two categories, there are varying versions and models available. Several factors affect the choice of the ideal earpiece, these factors include:

·         Discreetness- Security officials can chose an earpiece based on how discrete they want to be. The level of discreetness is determined by the earpiece style and color of the coiled tube. In-the ear earpieces are obviously discreet because they are worn inside the ear than over-the ear earpiece- with the wires and all. You can choose a colorless earpiece as opposed to a colored one for more secrecy or choose a wired earpiece altogether for total secrecy.

·         Comfort- You obviously want the earpiece you chose to be comfortable to wear. Choose an earpiece that fits well and that is made with hypoallergic materials. Some of the important questions to ask before choosing an earpiece include how easy the earpiece is to wear and remove, how easy is to use and control the device, can the earpiece remain intact as long as necessary without falling off. 

·         Versatility- The right earpiece should make it possible to wear underneath the clothes, attached to a collar or back of the tie.

·         Tastes and preferences- Different individuals have different tastes and preferences. You can chose an earpiece that meets your needs and preferences in terms of comfort, style and color
·         A security earpiece is normally worn inside or put around the ear depending on the type you choose and is usually connected to a 2- way radio or related device. An earpiece is also worn with a microphone and receiver that makes it possible for a person to communicate with other people wearing a similar earpiece. 

Earpieces are normally won by bodyguards and security personnel for instance the US secret service, law enforcement officers and private bodyguards and security personnel to allow discreet communication for security purposes. Earpieces are either wired or wireless, with each type having different models, types, styles and makes 

Earpieces can either be worn around the ear or in the entrance of the ear as a small ear bud. For extra discreetness, wireless earpieces are often preferred over wired ones since it’s hard to tell that someone is actually wearing a wireless earpiece as opposed to a wired earpiece. Wireless earpieces often receive signals wirelessly. A person needs to wear a separate microphone at the end of a sleeve or on a lapel. To send a message, the wearer needs to speak into the microphone and receive messages via the wireless earpiece

A wired earpiece works in the same way as a wireless earpiece the only difference is that the receiver is connected to the earpiece with a wire that anyone can see. However, the wire can be transparent to make it harder for people to notice. The wire is normally worn around the back of the ear to get out of the wearers way. 

There are different types of wired earpieces including one wire, two-wire and three wire. One wire microphone consists of a single wire and no microphone, two- wire comprises of an earpiece and a single wire connecting the earpiece to the microphone which is usually connected to a sleeve or lapel. 

A three-wire earpiece comprises of an earpiece, a microphone worn on the lapel, and a third wire that normally connects to a separate device on the hand to allow the wearer to activate the microphone at his discretion. 

As mentioned above there are typically two types of earpieces and a wide variety of models under each type. The ideal earpiece will be determined by the wearer’s preferences, level of secrecy wanted, cost, comfort, and how versatile the device is. 


Earpieceonline.co.uk is flooded with various models and makes so it’s important to understand your needs before buying an earpiece. Buy your earpiece from a reputable source, Do some research before buying your ideal security earpiece to understand the features, components, advantages, and disadvantages? 

Saturday, June 28, 2014

CML ntros NXDN radio fast-track processor

So i found this short article on the internet and i understand that just posting it like a whole article is not the right thing, I got consent from the original writer and read up ways to curate articles, so this is it…….i thought this was fascinating as it highlights some of the highs and lows that I encountered when i was working within the industry.


CML Microcircuits, a leading innovator and provider of low-power semiconductors for global wireless data and two-way radio communications markets, has released an NXDN processor with embedded Air Interface (AI) Protocol.


The CMX7131/7141 with the NXDN Function Image connects directly to the market-leading CMX994 Direct Conversion Receiver IC. Together, these devices form a formidable chip-set, enabling a fast development cycle for small, highly-integrated, multi-standard capable digital radios that will exhibit a long battery life.


The majority of the NXDN air interface physical layer (layer 1) and data link layer (layer 2) is embedded in the NXDN Function Image, plus a host of advanced features to support the complete radio system and simplify the overall radio design process.


NXDN is an FDMA digital Land Mobile Radio (LMR) open standard and has evolved to become a key narrowband technology in the LMR migration from analogue to digital. NXDN is supported by more than 25 international radio manufacturers and organisations that together form the NXDN Forum.


The new NXDN Function Image adds to the existing suite of CMX7131/7141 function images, now covering dPMR, NXDN, ARIB STD-T98, ARIB STD-T102 and legacy analogue PMR. A radio platform using the CMX7131/7141 can be switched to deliver any of these systems by uploading the appropriate Function Image. This allows radio manufacturers to take advantage of economies-of-scale by adopting a Software Defined Radio (SDR) design route, with one radio design supporting a number of different systems and markets.


The DE9944 FDMA SDR Demonstrator is also available, providing the fastest route from development through to production.


The CMX7131/CMX7141 processors and function images are available now, offering low power 3.3V operation in small VQFN/LQFP packaging.


Source - http://www.ciol.com/ciol/news/212691/cml-ntros-nxdn-radio-fast-track-processor


Tuesday, June 24, 2014

NuForce gets serious about making great headphones

What would you know, this website About keyword is definitely interesting, i trust you enjoy it


The new NuForce Primo 8 in-ears are supposed to be awfully good. The Audiophiliac tries them on.


NuForce is primarily known as a high-end electronics manufacturer that also makes outstandingaffordable products. I’ve been a fan for years, and while they’ve offered headphones in the past, the new Primo 8 in-ears aim higher. I liked them from the get-go, so I used the Primo 8 for a few weeks as my everyday, walking-around headphones. The more I listened, the more I liked them. That’s really saying something because when I’m not reviewing an in-ear headphone I use my Jerry Harvey JH13($1,099) custom-molded-to-my-ears ‘phones. Hey, I’m a headphone reviewer and a hard-core audiophile, so I use the best stuff.


Anyway, the Primo 8, which runs $499, didn’t leave me missing the JH13.


The Primo 8′s rated 38 ohm impedance and high sensitivity make it easier to drive than most in-ears, so it can play pretty loudly from your phone. I found the Primo 8′s isolation from noise on the New York subway better than I’ve found in most universal-fit in-ear headphones. NuForce claims it has a proprietary cable and crossover network for the Primo 8′s four balanced armature drivers in each earpiece. The cables are user-replaceable, so when they break, and all headphones cables will eventually fail, you can just buy a new cable and be on your way. The Primo 8 comes with a huge assortment of ear tips, so getting a good, tight seal should be easy.


The Primo 8′s sound is neutral and clear — there’s no boosted bass or exaggerated treble; it just sounds right. The clarity is unforced, and that’s a rare commodity nowadays. Take the Cardas EM8513 in-ears ($425) — they have more bass and overall detail, but switching to the Primo 8, the sound is far more natural. It’s also more comfortable to wear for extended periods of time. The Sennheiser IE-800 in-ear headphones are more transparent and open sounding than the Primo 8 or EM8513, but the IE-800 sells for $1,000! Again, the IE-800 succeeds by being even-tempered in its sound; nothing jumps out or annoys — the balance is spot on. Even so, the Primo 8 is more comfortable, and until you compare it with headphones that sell for double the price, the sound is very respectable. The Primo 8 is a true audiophile headphone, and while it’s expensive, you’d have to spend a lot more to get something better.


Source – http://www.cnet.com/uk/news/headphones-reviews-nuforce-primo8-audiophiliac/


Thursday, June 19, 2014

Diverse Power Leverages Exalt Backhaul for Large-Scale UHF Radio Network

This site is amazing! i never thought that this could become an website….hope all enjoys it


 


Exalt Communications, Inc., the leading innovator of next-generation wireless connectivity systems for private networks and Internet infrastructures, today announced that Diverse Power, an electric membership cooperative based in La Grange, GA has deployed Exalt ExploreAir microwave backhaul systems to link traffic from its TETRA UHF radio network back to its fiber core.


With 36,000 customers throughout counties in Georgia and Alabama, Diverse Power’s far-flung operations in this rural area require highly reliable radio communications among its maintenance personnel. Working with Exalt partner Dean’s Commercial Two-Way of Cataula, GA, Diverse Power deployed a TETRA UHF radio system for its workers and selected Exalt ExploreAir microwave backhaul systems to carry traffic among sites in Manchester, Mulberry Grove, and Red Oak, GA.


“We wanted a first-class system all the way with our radio network, and Dean’s Two Way recommended Exalt for its outstanding performance and reasonable price,” said Randy Shepard, senior vice president of Diverse Power. “Exalt gives us a fiber-speed backhaul infrastructure that we can rely on in all weather conditions, even during the recent ice storms.”


Diverse Power deployed Exalt ExploreAir systems in all-outdoor configurations on links between Mulberry Grove and Manchester, and between Red Oak and Manchester. The systems carry 100 megabits per-second of Ethernet traffic. While the microwave systems backhaul voice radio traffic today, Diverse Power is looking ahead to carrying SCADA traffic over the links in the future.


“Fiber and microwave are the only technologies that can reliably backhaul traffic, and Exalt microwave offers customers distinct advantages when expanding a network over a broad geographical area,” said Amir Zoufonoun, CEO of Exalt. “Our systems are scalable, providing customers like Diverse Power the capacity they need to optimize energy delivery, increase productivity, enable two-way information exchange with customers for greater control over their electricity costs, and easily add future service offerings.”


About Exalt Communications


Exalt Communications, Inc. is a forerunner in the global Internet revolution, delivering high-value wireless systems that transform the economics of connectivity. Exalt wireless systems extend or complement network fiber and replace now-outdated copper, enabling customers to accelerate time-to-market, optimize network performance, and reduce network infrastructure costs. Today, over 2,000 global customers, from the world’s largest mobile operators to independent service providers, government agencies, and multinational enterprises depend on Exalt systems as they move their applications to the Cloud, enable mobility, and connect the unconnected.


Read more at http://www.broadwayworld.com/bwwgeeks/article/Diverse-Power-Leverages-Exalt-Backhaul-for-Large-Scale-UHF-Radio-Network-20140402#VrUcmLhd4WjO3IKs.99


Wednesday, June 18, 2014

Here"s a Brief History of Headphones

You’ve probably stumbled upon this looking for information about headset’s, hopefully this will help you answer some of those questions, if not please click on one of the relevant links within the article


During the past century, human ears have enjoyed less freedom than ever before, but more music, thanks to the invention of headphones. In 1910, a Nathaniel Baldwin invented headphones in the kitchen of his Utah home, forever subjecting our ears to the shackles of small speakers.


Aside from allowing you to furtively listen to the latest Carly Rae Jepsen single, headphones enable people to privately and individually interact with media, even when in a noisy room or a crowded subway. Headphones are also crucial tools used for recording music, and producing films, TV and radio programming.


Here is a timeline of how we’ve gone from Baldwin’s “Baldy Phones” to Apple’s earbuds EarPods and “Beats by Dre.”


1910: Nathaniel Baldwin Invents the First Headphones


The legend states that Lt. Comdr. A. J. Hepburn of the U.S. Navy received for prototype for a pair of telephones fashioned into a headset, along with a letter from Nathaniel Baldwin written with purple ink on blue and pink paper. After initially disregarding the message, Hepburn tested the device and found that it worked surprisingly well to transmit sound.


The Navy began to ask for more headphones from Baldwin, who could only accept orders of 10 at a time because he was producing them in his kitchen.


If it’s not evident from his choice of stationery and writing utensil, Baldwin was an interesting fellow. He was a fundamentalist Mormon who studied at Brigham Young Academy (later renamed Brigham Young University), and eventually earned an electrical engineering degree from Stanford.


He returned to BYU as a professor but was fired for speaking out in favor of polygamy, a practice which the Mormon Church renounced in 1890. (Though he endorsed polygamy, he had only one wife.)


Original Koss SP3 Headphones1958: John C. Koss Introduces SP3 Stereophones, Made For Music


Until this point, people used headphones almost exclusively for radio communication.


John Koss was born and raised in Wisconsin. He got married in 1952, at which time he started a business using a cash wedding gift with which him and his bride were supposed to buy a sofa, according to the Wisconsin Historical Society.


While introducing a portable phonograph he wanted to rent to patients in Milwaukee hospitals, he revealed the original Koss SP3 Stereophones. Initially intended to be a sidebar, the headphones proved revolutionary because their sound quality made them optimal for listening to music. The Koss Corporation, located in Milwaukee, is still making headphones today.


1979: Sony Releases ‘Walkman,’ Headphones Go on a Diet


Before portable music players, headphones tended to be big. Baldwin’s original set weighed upwards of a pound.


Koss’ stereophones were circumaural, meaning the earpads would literally engulf your ears. It made sense at the time. “Audiophiles” could listen to the latest Beatles, Pink Floyd and Led Zeppelin albums in the comfort of their homes, and the bulbus design of their headphones helped to block outside noise.


With the help of the Sony “Walkman,” recorded music soon liberated itself from the home stereo, creating a need for more portable headphones. Conveniently, a lightweight set of MDR-3L2 headphones was included with the portable cassette player. As opposed to Koss’ circumaural headphones, Sony’s were supra-aural, meaning the earpads pressed against the ears.


 




 



1989: Dr. Amar Bose Introduces the First Noise-Reducing Headset


On a flight home from Zurich in 1978, Dr. Amar Bose tried an early set of electronic headphones that were newly onboard for passenger entertainment — but he could barely hear anything with the overwhelming cabin noise. He returned to Boston and set up a research program at Bose Corporation (which he founded in 1964), to investigate how ambient noise could be reduced with active noise cancellation. The Noise Reduction Technology Group (NRTG) grew out of that program, and in 1989, the company introduced the first noise-reduction headset, designed for the aviation industry.


2001: Apple iPod Includes Earbuds, Which Now Total 600 Million


The trend towards smaller and more portable headphones eventually led to earbuds and in-earphones, which only differ in the degree to which they wedge into the ear canal.


In 2001, Apple introduced the iPod to the world. The iPod, and later iPhone and iPad, comes with a now-iconic set of basic white earbuds. A decade later, iPod sales have topped 300 million. Begin to do the math, totaling sales of iPods, iPhones and iPads, and you begin to realize there are an astronomical number of Apple earbuds in circulation.


During the announcement of a long-awaited upgrade the company’s stock headset at the iPhone 5 unveiling on Sept. 12, Apple said that it had shipped 600 million sets of the first generation of earbuds — that’s roughly one for every 12 people on the planet. Regardless of your opinion on the quality of the product, those earbuds get around.


2008: Beats by Dr. Dre Hits the Market


Hip hop artist and producer Dr. Dre teamed up with Interscope Chairman Jimmy Iovine to launch Beats by Dr. Dre, helping to solidifying headphones as a fashion statement. The brand has recruited celebrities, including Will.i.am, Justin Bieber, Lady Gaga and Lebron James, to endorse the products. Today, Beats by Dr. Dre has 63% market share in U.S. for headphones priced over $100.


2011: Sennheiser Sells $40,000 Orpheus Headphones, World’s Most Expensive


At an audio show in Seoul, South Korea, the German headphone company Sennheiser unveiled the world’s most expensive headphones. The company released 300 sets of the Orpheus headphones, which were priced at 30,000 Euros, or roughly $41,000 a piece.


If you’re still on the fence about making that big of an investment, try them out with the following video.


2012: Apple Redefines Earbuds with the EarPods


The launch of the iPhone 5 ushered in a new era of headphone design — the EarPod. The periscope-like headphones are designed to direct sound right into the ear, and they hold up pretty well.



Headphones have come a long way in the past 100 years, revolutionizing the way we consume media and the way we communicate. In addition to sets that transmit with extremely high fidelity, other notable advancements include wireless headphones, Bluetooth headsets and headsets that include a microphone which can be connected to telephones or computers.


As portable media consumption continues to rise with smartphones and tablets, the need for headphones will be greater than ever.


Source - http://mashable.com/2012/09/26/headphones/


Tuesday, June 3, 2014

Icom Radio Earpiece: Technology at its Best

We’re residing in a world that revolves around technology’s latest innovations. Communication forms the backbone of every business in the world. Global operations function effectively on quality based communication systems. Discrete communication systems are setup for the purpose of sending, receiving and regulating information to the right destination. If you wish to ensure steady communication between recipients, secure and effective equipments must be utilized. Of this, the two way radio is a popular tool in demand. If you’re an avid user of the two way radio, then combining this technology with the Icom radio earpiece brings about effective communication.
Benefits of Icom Radio Earpiece
The earpiece technology comes alongside a microphone that allows you to convey information across. The Icom radio earpiece is comfortable and doesn’t expose the two way radio during usage. While keeping the radio attached to your belt, the earpiece easily conveys sound waves as input and excellent output. Now imagine having a radio that is almost portable and doesn’t risk the chance of being dropped or exposed to environmental hazards? Extend the usage and life span of your radio by using Icom radio earpiece that has become a popular choice today. The earpiece can be easily accommodated inside the clothing for its small size and lightweight. Four distinct kinds of two way radios have been presented that occupy four types of Icom earpiece connectors.
The available Icom radio earpiece connectors have a sleek design that performs tasks while using two way radios. The earpiece has been configured particularly for certain task however it can easily be compatible with a number of other features. It is important to check if the Icom radio earpiece is compatible with the type you own. The radio earpieces offer quick communication with instant connectivity. A good example is when you have a straight pin connector that functions well with marine radios. If such a connector is used for domestic radios, the audio quality can differ greatly.
Every radio purchased is unique and is meant for transmitting information in distinct environments. Hence while choosing the kind of earpiece you want, there are certain assets considered before purchasing. The Icom radio earpiece offers optimum level of consistency and performance based, it is the best. The earpieces improve sound quality in environments like fleet and transport, healthcare, real estate, security, shipping etc. Icom has ensured that its particular edition of two way radio earpieces performs certain tasks.
Features of Icom Radio Earpiece
Besides having excellent compatibility with two way radios, the brand composes the earpiece from high quality cables with durable surface. Such material protects the cable from wear and tear and offers a decent strain relief. Icom radio earpieces are lightweight yet are protected from damage in worst case scenarios. You wouldn’t want to lose connection while using the radio however the Icom earpieces have excellent connectivity.
The earpieces can easily withstand consistent collisions and will continue working despite undergoing strain. They have the capacity to work reliably in every condition. This particular radio earpiece is different because it has a tough framework. Unlike other weak cables that get damaged after withstanding massive strain, Icom makes a massive difference.
The earpieces have been designed in such a manner that they care encased inside your ear canal consisting of a microphone that is composed of high impact polycarbonate. This ensures that communication is uninterrupted and noise proof. The acoustic tube can be easily replaced and removed if it gets damaged. The button or controller that allows one to communicate is placed in your hand than on the collar. Knowing its capabilities, security companies have begun utilizing this gadget for its hi-tech features comfort.
Conclusion

It comes with a smart three wire design having separate connections with the microphone and the main control system (push to talk button) ensures that your conversations are instantly connected. Any kind of interference caused by external agents is eliminated making the gadget absolutely noise proof. Enjoy connecting with clients, colleagues while coordinating events and communicating with your loved ones. The Icom radio earpiece is a modern invention that has surpassed expectations in the world of communication. For two way radios, the Icom earpiece technology has been claimed as one of the best communication tools of the world. The durability and snug fitting makes it the ideal earpiece for ensuring prolonged communication.