Saturday, January 24, 2015

A Look At The Different Motorola Radio Earpieces

When it comes to discreet affairs, there definitely must be a discreet communication. Whether it is a security personnel or just a private group of designated people. Radios are used for communication between compatible devices within a specified location. Nevertheless, it would be less comfortable if someone talks via the radio and everyone hear the entire communication. Given the different types of two-way radios in the market, they usually come with a compatible earpiece. Among the most common radios are the Motorola radios. It would be super discreet and stylish if you had a Motorola radio earpiece to accompany your device. Some of the ideal Motorola 2-way radio earpiece connectors at EarpieceOnline include the following;

CP040 & DP4400 2-Pin Connector

This Motorola 2-pin connector can work with a number of Motorola 2-way radios. It can also support some of the old version radios such as the GP040 and the GP300. Some of the novel version of radios that are compatible to this earpiece include the DP1400 and the DP1000.

Features of the connector

• It has a changeable Foam sock so that you can replace if it has worn out.

• The earpiece also has a comfortable and flexible C-shaped earpiece.

• There is a secure moulded ear hook, for holding firm on the ear.

• It provides high quality audio.

• It comes with a noise reducing microphone for enhanced reception of incoming voice messages.

• The earpiece has a plastic that is covered by a label clip PTT button. The wire PTT is separated from the microphone and an ear hangar earpiece.

• It has a RoHS compliant feature and comes with Motorola earpiece 2-pin connector GP300/CP040/XTN and GP340 adapters.

DP3400 & DP3600 Multi Connector

This is a multi pin connector works with all DP3000 & DP4000 range of radios, with a 12-pin connector, it slots perfect onto the side of the DP radio and is securely screwed in so that the earpiece is securely locked in.

Features

• It is incorporated with Kevlar Reinforced for better surveillance and security.

• It has a secure fit tube connector, to avoid accidents of it cut from rough encounters.

• It offers a high quality audio.

• The earpiece has a Lapel clip PTT button and a separate wire PTT. That is separated from a noise reduction microphone and an acoustic tube. The acoustic tube runs over the ear, the FBI style.

• There is a changeable connector for flexible modification and flexible mushroom plugs that you can replace whenever.

DP2400 & DP2600 multi connector

This is yet another different multi-pin connector that lets you connect to the DP2000 range of radios. This 8-pin connector fits on to the side of the radio and is locked in with a 'pull out and slot-in' connector, reducing the risk of broken screws or damage to the radio.

Features

• The acoustic tube runs over the ear and it has a secure fit connector for super surveillance and comfort.

• It has a separate wire PPT different from the acoustic tube and a microphone that reduces noise from the surrounding.

• The mushroom plugs are changeable and you can simply remove them when they are loose or worn out.

• It produces a high quality audio that reduces strain even when in a noisy environment.

GP340 & GP680

This multi connector is compatible the GP range of radios, including the GP340 and GP680. The Connector is a 13-pin connector and is secured on the side of the radio, with a screw-in to secure the earpiece to the radio.

Features

• This multi connector has a high quality audio reception. That makes it comfortable to use anywhere, even in a crowded, noisy place.

• There is a microphone, which is separate from a wire PTT and an acoustic tube. The microphone is a noise reducing microphone, that helps to make the other end-user be comfortable.

• It has a RoHS compliant and an over the ear acoustic tube that holds firm to the ear.

• There is an adjustable connector that is versatile to other devices.

An elegant and well fitted earpiece will not only promote surveillance, but it will also be comfortable on the ear. That will ensure it is safe from damages in rough situations. A Motorola radio earpiece will be beneficial if you want a comfortable communication without having to speak loudly over the radio. Some of the radios are also slightly heavy, which makes them more comfortable when using an earpiece, that is worn beneath the clothing.

Sunday, January 18, 2015

Channel 4 Buys Hitler’s Hair for 3 Thousand Pounds

British TV station Channel 4 is being strongly criticized after it authorized the purchase of a lock of hair that apparently once belonged to Adolf Hitler, for £3000.



The hair, which was acquired for DNA testing as part of the upcoming show ‘Dead Famous DNA’, was allegedly collected by the Dictator’s barber.

Channel 4 bought the hair from Nazi sympathizer and Holocaust denier David Irving. The controversial ‘historian’ also attempted to sell other Nazi memorabilia online in 2009.

Yahoo! News quoted Labour MP Ian Austin as saying that the sale represented a particularly uncouth publicity stunt. Austin said, “This sounds sick. It's appalling that Channel 4 would get involved with a Holocaust denier in some bizarre and tawdry show purporting to be entertainment (...) It’s disgusting, and raises questions about Channel 4’spublic broadcasting remit.”

However, Channel 4 defended the move, with a spokesperson saying that “We believe the potential importance of the scientific and historical insight justified the purchase,”



Initially considered to be a respected academic, British author David Irving’s career as a historian gradually fell into decline as his works became more and more biased towards Hitler’s Third Reich. He has since spoken at various Neo Nazi rallies and has gone on record, a great many times, as both a Holocaust denier and a virulent anti-Semite. He has stated that he believes in a Jewish conspiracy to rule the world and has openly accused concentration camp survivors of lying about their experiences.

At the time of writing, Irving is banned from entering Germany, Austria, Italy, Australia and Canada.

According to The Jewish Chronicle Online, Mark Gardner, director of communications at the Community Security Trust, said, “It is distasteful to see Hitler being sensationalized in this way, but even worse that David Irving â€" of all people â€" ought to profit from it in this way.”

‘Dead Famous DNA’ is to be fronted by Mark Evans and will see the DNA testing of the remains of other famous figures from history. People like Charles Darwin, Marilyn Monroe and Napoleon Bonaparte. The programme will be broadcast later this week.

you can find more information from this website Here

Tuesday, January 13, 2015

NASA Confirms Liquid Water on Saturn’s Moonell

A major scientific discovery was made this week as scientists uncovered overwhelming evidence indicating the presence of a ‘great lake’ on Saturn’s moon Enceladus. The discovery is important because it marks Enceladus as being a possible site for life existing outside of our own planet.

Initially, icy material was seen being squirted into space from an odd ‘striped’ pattern on the moon’s southern pole. It was theorized that this material was water being ejected from a large body of liquid H20 on the moon’s surface. This week, measurements from NASA’s Cassini probe revealed the water’s gravitational signal, effectively confirming the theory. The Cassini probe even sampled the water as it was ejected into space.

Professor Luciano Less, of the Sapienza University of Rome, who was interviewed on the subject by BBC news, said, "The measurements that we have done are consistent with the existence of a large water reservoir about the size (volume) of Lake Superior in North America,"

To add context to this statement, Lake Superior is the largest freshwater lake in the world by surface and the third largest in the world by volume. It reaches depths of 147 metres and has an approximate volume of 12,000 Km3. It also plays home to over 80 different species of fish.

Data extracted from the probe suggests that the water is about 40km underneath Enceladus’ icy surface.

Enceladus is locked in an eccentric orbit around its parent planet; this means that the moon’s orbit is non-circular and it therefore follows that Saturn’s gravity will have the effect of melting the ice in some places and freezing any liquid found in others.

There are a lot of places in our solar system that possibly house liquid water, but not as many where that water can come into contact with rock. Rock is important because rocks release minerals and salts into the water - and these materials are among the key building blocks of life.

Professor Andrew Coates of the UCL-Mullard Space Science Laboratory was also interviewed for BBC news, he remained positive regarding the possibility of microbal life on Enceladus. Prof Coates said, "I think Enceladus has gone to the top of the charts in terms of a place where there could be life. (...) It's got several of the things which you need for life - there's certainly the presence of heat, there's liquid water in this ocean, there's organics and that type of chemistry going on. (...) The only question is, has there been enough time for life to develop?"

However, as Professor David Stevenson, from the California Institute of Technology, pointed out “we don’t know whether the ocean is beinghere or is freezing up”. It is theoretically possible that the great body of water confirmed this week has been there for 100 million years, but it is also potentially a far more recent development. At present, no one knows for sure.



you can find the original piece here

Sunday, January 11, 2015

Gupta: Cell phones, brain tumors and a wired earpiece

When we found this short article we were so pleased, having hunted for over a year for this, finding it on this blog was an thrilling time for me.

Just about every time I use a cell phone, I plug in my wired earpiece first. Having discussed the use of earpieces on several news shows, people expect to see me using one. If I am walking around the CNN studios, my colleagues often comment on it. In airports, people will stop me in the rare cases I forget to use the earpiece, and remind me about it. Perhaps, they are intrigued because I am a neurosurgeon who openly shows some concern about cell phones.

Truth is, it is a pretty easy thing to do â€" using an earpiece. Furthermore, my neck doesn’t hurt after being on the phone for a long conference call, and given that many of those calls take place in a car, an earpiece becomes a requirement. Still, though, I don’t want to dodge the obvious question: Do cell phones cause brain cancer?

It may be too early to say for sure. The latency period or time between exposure and recognition of a tumor is around 20 years, sometimes longer. And, cell phone use in the U.S. has been popular for only around 15 years. Back in 1996, there were 34 million cell phone users. Today there are 9-10 times as many. Keeping that in mind, it is worth taking a more detailed look at the results of Interphone, a multinational study designed to try to answer this question.

The headline from this study was there was little or no evidence to show an association between cell phones and cancer. Though, if you went to the appendix of the study, which interestingly was available only online, you found something unsettling. The data showed people who used a cell phone 10 years or more doubled the risk of developing a glioma, a type of brain tumor. And, across the board â€" most of the studies that have shown an increased risk are from Scandinavia, a place where cell phones have been popular since the early 1990s. For these reasons, the whole issue of latency could become increasingly important.

Cell phones use non-ionizing radiation, which is very different from the ionizing radiation of X-rays, which everyone agrees are harmful. Non-ionizing radiation won’t strip electrons or bust up DNA. It's more like very low power microwaves. Short term, these microwaves are likely harmless, but long term could be a different story. Anyway, who likes the idea of a microwave, even a low-powered one, next to their head all day?

And, what about kids? I have three of them, aged 5, 4 and 2. Fact is, they are more likely to lead to my early demise than cell phones. But, as hard as it is to believe sometimes, they actually have thinner skulls than adults, and will probably be using cell phones longer than I ever will.

The first person to encourage me to regularly wear an ear piece was Dr. Keith Black. He also is a neurosurgeon, and makes a living removing â€" you guessed it â€" brain tumors. Keith has long believed there is a link, and for some time, his was a lonely voice in this discussion. Nowadays, he has loud and prominent voices accompanying him. Ronald Herberman, director of the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, sent a memo warning staffers to limit their cell phone use. One of the possible consequences, he says, is an increased risk of brain cancer. The city of San Francisco is trying to pass an ordinance requiring radiation. The European Environmental Agency has said cell phones could be as big a public health risk as smoking, asbestos and leaded gasoline. Even the makers of cell phones suggest you don’t place a device against your head, but rather advocate holding it 5/8 to a full inch away.

Many will roll their eyes at this, scoffing at the precautionary principle on display here. Fair enough. Still, I like my wired earpiece, and I don’t have to turn my life upside down to use it. I also text and email a lot more, because my kids rarely allow me to have a phone conversation. Speaking of kids, you will probably see mine using earpieces too, when my wife and I decide they are old enough to use one, which isn’t in the foreseeable future.

you can get the original article here

Friday, January 9, 2015

What Can Visual Communications Do?

In a word?  Everything. Visual communication is the conveyance of ideas or meanings via visual images. This includes everything from illustration to logo design, from typography to road signs.

Employing visual communications in your business is a great way to increase your brand awareness. Today, corporate entities and their associated products can be readily identified worldwide, simply by an act of visual communication.

Consider the ‘McDonald’s Golden Arches’ Logo. When it is placed on a road sign, this logo is usually only accompanied by the number of miles away the nearest restaurant is. This suggests that the logo itself is so well known that no text is needed to explain it.

The Nike ‘Swoosh’ is another prominent example, as is Apple’s, um, Apple.

The subject of the corporate world’s reliance on visual communication (together with its effect on the rest of us) was covered extensively by Naomi Klein, one of our favourite authors, in her 2000 bestseller, ‘No Logo’. She says,

“Advertising and sponsorship have always been about using imagery to equate products with positive cultural or lifestyle experiences. What makes nineties-style branding different is that it increasingly seeks to take these associations out of the representational realm and make them a livid reality. So the goal is not merely to have child actors drinking Coke in a TV commercial, but for students to brainstorm concepts for Coke’s next ad campaign in English class.”

If you’re looking for a definitive answer to your question, look no futher than ‘No Logo’.

Visual communication can be used to convey instant meaning, which is especially good for road signs. Typically, road signs contain no words, just an image representing the thing that motorists are supposed to be aware of. A figure of a man digging up the road, for example, denotes roadworks ahead (although, to be fair, it also looks as if he could be putting up an umbrella). A silhouette of a deer (or, in Australia, a kangaroo) indicates the presence of animals in the area that may pose a danger to motorists (or themselves).

It is also used as a sort of communicational shorthand, with increasing levels of cross-cultural complexity. For example, horror movies would once have been advertised with a typeface made from blood, or slime, to convey the ‘horror’ of the movie. However in today’s world, such advertising would only be used in pastiche horror movies, or else horror movies that were being made to invoke a bygone era. Movies that used a stereotypically ‘ethnic’ typeface (such as to evoke a now-problematic ‘Chinese’ or ‘Indian’ feel), might now find that those typefaces are used for movies knowingly aimed at Asian American or British-Indian audiences.

Visual communication can provide a wealth of information in just one simple image, or a few words. The ‘Star Wars’ typeface, for example, evokes the science fiction film franchise, even if all it says is “Danger: High Voltage” or similar.

A Look At The Different Motorola Radio Earpieces

When it comes to discreet affairs, there definitely must be a discreet communication. Whether it is a security personnel or just a private group of designated people. Radios are used for communication between compatible devices within a specified location. Nevertheless, it would be less comfortable if someone talks via the radio and everyone hear the entire communication. Given the different types of two-way radios in the market, they usually come with a compatible earpiece. Among the most common radios are the Motorola radios. It would be super discreet and stylish if you had A Motorola radio earpiece to accompany your device. Some of the ideal Motorola 2-way radio earpiece connectors at EarpieceOnline include the following;

CP040 & DP4400 2-Pin Connector

This Motorola 2-pin connector can work with a number of Motorola 2-way radios. It can also support some of the old version radios such as the GP040 and the GP300. Some of the novel version of radios that are compatible to this earpiece include the DP1400 and the DP1000.

Features of the connector

• It has a changeable Foam sock so that you can replace if it has worn out.

• The earpiece also has a comfortable and flexible C-shaped earpiece.

• There is a secure moulded ear hook, for holding firm on the ear.

• It provides high quality audio.

• It comes with a noise reducing microphone for enhanced reception of incoming voice messages.

• The earpiece has a plastic that is covered by a label clip PTT button. The wire PTT is separated from the microphone and an ear hangar earpiece.

• It has a RoHS compliant feature and comes with Motorola earpiece 2-pin connector GP300/CP040/XTN and GP340 adapters.

DP3400 & DP3600 Multi Connector

This is a multi pin connector works with all DP3000 & DP4000 range of radios, with a 12-pin connector, it slots perfect onto the side of the DP radio and is securely screwed in so that the earpiece is securely locked in.

Features

• It is incorporated with Kevlar Reinforced for better surveillance and security.

• It has a secure fit tube connector, to avoid accidents of it cut from rough encounters.

• It offers a high quality audio.

• The earpiece has a Lapel clip PTT button and a separate wire PTT. That is separated from a noise reduction microphone and an acoustic tube. The acoustic tube runs over the ear, the FBI style.

• There is a changeable connector for flexible modification and flexible mushroom plugs that you can replace whenever.

DP2400 & DP2600 multi connector

This is yet another different multi-pin connector that lets you connect to the DP2000 range of radios. This 8-pin connector fits on to the side of the radio and is locked in with a 'pull out and slot-in' connector, reducing the risk of broken screws or damage to the radio.

Features

• The acoustic tube runs over the ear and it has a secure fit connector for super surveillance and comfort.

• It has a separate wire PPT different from the acoustic tube and a microphone that reduces noise from the surrounding.

• The mushroom plugs are changeable and you can simply remove them when they are loose or worn out.

• It produces a high quality audio that reduces strain even when in a noisy environment.

GP340 & GP680

This multi connector is compatible the GP range of radios, including the GP340 and GP680. The Connector is a 13-pin connector and is secured on the side of the radio, with a screw-in to secure the earpiece to the radio.

Features

• This multi connector has a high quality audio reception. That makes it comfortable to use anywhere, even in a crowded, noisy place.

• There is a microphone, which is separate from a wire PTT and an acoustic tube. The microphone is a noise reducing microphone, that helps to make the other end-user be comfortable.

• It has a RoHS compliant and an over the ear acoustic tube that holds firm to the ear.

• There is an adjustable connector that is versatile to other devices.

An elegant and well fitted earpiece will not only promote surveillance, but it will also be comfortable on the ear. That will ensure it is safe from damages in rough situations. A Motorola radio earpiece will be beneficial if you want a comfortable communication without having to speak loudly over the radio. Some of the radios are also slightly heavy, which makes them more comfortable when using an earpiece, that is worn beneath the clothing.

Wednesday, January 7, 2015

City faces decision on radio infrastructure

I do not know how you came here as you read it on social media, twitter, facebook, google +, stumble upon or somewhere else. thankyou for visiting and I hope you like reading this as much as I did.

The City of Edmond faces a decision about whether to replace or upgrade public safety radio infrastructure to the tune of about $6 million, said Matt Stillwell, director of Public Safety Communications and Emergency Management.

Edmond purchased a 7-channel Motorola MHz SmartNet radio system in 1998. Seven years ago, the system interfaced with a different Motorola system operated by the state, Stillwell said.

“Our technology is going to be 20 years old in four short years,” Stillwell said. “… Think of your cell systems and how they have changed since the 1990s. The same dynamics affect radio systems.”

Changes in technology, governance and an aging infrastructure will inform what system changes the city should choose within seven years, Stillwell said.

The city maintains ownership of its seven channels and the state added 10 more channels to local sites, Stillwell said. All local governments use this system, but not everybody has paid for its maintenance. Only six municipalities help pay for the system.

“The citizens of Edmond are paying for a system of any (yearly) infrastructure maintenance, while other users of the same sites are not,” Stillwell said.

The City of Edmond joined the state’s system in 2007. A lot of other communities join the system through grant dollars, he said. The upgrade was paid for by state dollars and cost the city nothing, he said.

Questions are unanswered as to how many radios for police, fire and emergency management would be impacted by a new system, Stillwell told The Edmond Sun.

“We won’t have to replace all of the hand-held radios that are out in the field,” Stillwell said. “Most of the radios we have been purchasing for the last five years are digital capable and P-25 capable.”

The P-25 is a radio standard that all of the public safety radio vendors use, Stillwell added.

Directors of city departments recently identified $143.6 million worth of unfunded city projects they say the city needs. The Edmond City Council heard presentations about these needs, such as the public safety radio infrastructure, at a public workshop. (For coverage of other capital improvement projects discussed by the city, look at www.edmondsun.com.)

A funding source to pay for these infrastructure improvements is in the first phases of discussion, said Larry Stevens, city manager. There are concerns that the 2000 Capital Improvement 3/4-cent sales tax will not provide adequate funding for major capital projects, Stevens said.

The city welcomes public input by Edmond residents and future recommendations by the Capital Projects and Financing Task Force, Stevens added.

Either Edmond will partner with the state to upgrade with the latest digital technology, or pursue an independent digital upgrade without the cushion of state funding, Stillwell explained.

“The bottom line is we have to move away from that analogue. End-of-life issues are coming up with our technology,” Stillwell said. - See more at: http://www.edmondsun.com/local/x1760083917/City-faces-decision-on-radio-infrastructure#sthash.bqDBsfhK.dpuf

Sunday, January 4, 2015

Moto X Review: The Very first Bluetooth Earpiece I Wasn't Ashamed for you to Wear

The basis of this post is to make you think about what in life is significant and what does getting the up-to-date radio accessory really represent to us

Bluetooth earpieces have always stuck out. I mean they've literally stuck out of your ear. Perhaps they're not as much of a fashion faux pas as Google Glass, but there's definitely a stigma about them. To combat the cyborg look, some wearable manufacturers are building smartwatches, but Motorola also has a backup plan: a tiny, handsome earbud that can act like a personal assistant.

What Is It?

It's an itsy bitsy teenie weenie Bluetooth headsetâ€"basically the entire thing fits inside your ear. It pairs more or less seamlessly with Motorola's already very good voice-control software on the new Moto X, allowing you to do stuff with your phone while it's still in your pocket/purse/backpack/bathroom floor. Did you see the movie Her? Remember the earpieces they wore to interact with their digital assistants? This is basically the beta version of that. But with a less robust (and less sexy) operating system.

Who's It For?

It's for people who have secretly wanted the utility of a hands-free Bluetooth headset but couldn't bear the stigma of wearing one in public. I mean, beauty is in the eye of the beholder and all, but come on, those things make you look like an asshole. Realtalk. While it'll work with any Bluetooth-capable phone (which is basically every phone) it's especially designed to work with Motorola's latest and greatest.

Design

From an engineering point of view, it's really damn impressive. It packs in a speaker, a touch-sensitive panel, dual noise-canceling microphones, a battery, and an IR proximity detector into something that's the size of a thimble and weighs only 6 grams (or 0.2 ounces). You can even trick out the Hint with backplates made of different materials, like canvas, wood, and leather, so you can match it to your Moto X though Moto Maker.

Motorola couldn't cram a very large battery in there, though: Indeed, there's just a 46 mAh cell inside the Hint's diminutive chassis. To put that in perspective, that is exactly 1/50th (yes,fiftieth) of the size of the battery in the Moto X. So, to help you get through the day, Motorola also built a rather clever carrying case that doubles as a portable charging station.

Drop your Hint into the little docking port inside the case, plug in a standard micro-USB cable, and you'll actually be charging two batteries at once: the 46mAh cell inside the Hint, and a second 150mAh battery in the case that holds an additional 2.5 charges worth of electricity. Simply pop the Hint out of your ear when it's running low, and into the little slide-out cubby on the Charging Case once again. When you close the case, an LED light at the top begins to pulse so that you know it's working.

The case, too, can be customized to match your earpiece and phone (though I'm not sure if there's a wood variant). It's easy on the eyes, definitely pocket-sized, and convenient.

Using It

You pair the Hint with your Moto X pretty much like you'd pair anything else. It's a simple process and thankfully it worked on the first try (which isn't always the case with Bluetooth audio devices). Once paired, you can choose to set the Hint as a "trusted device" which means that when the Hint is connected to your phone you can bypass your lockscreen. In other words, if you have the Hint in your ear (not in your pocket), you'll be able to skip straight to your homescreen as soon as you turn on your phone. Definitely handy. To save power, the Hint uses a proximity detector to tell if it's actually in your ear, and switch to standby mode whenever you take it out. But when it's in your ear, it's constantly listening.

At least, it is if you're using a Moto X.

You don't have to have a Moto X in order to use the Moto Hint. The Hint uses a standard Bluetooth protocol for audio which means it will pair and work with any smartphone that supports it (yes, even iPhones). It will work just like a regular Bluetooth earpiece. You'll be able to use it for all your calls and it will still be discreet and good-looking, and maybe that's all you really want anywayâ€"a smaller, more attractive earpiece. That said, you'll be missing some of the banner features like being able to interact with your phone via Moto Voice and the Hint constantly listening for your command.

What's it listening for? Glad you asked. You may remember that the Moto X smartphone also has an always-listening feature where you can program a wake-up phrase of your choice to instantly unlock the phone and allow you to immediately issue a voice command. Originally mine was, "Miiister Anderson…" a la Hugo Weaving, but I've since changed it to, "Hi there Jenny." I'm not totally sure why. Regardless, assuming you're using the Hint with a Moto X, it uses the same wake-up phrase, and then you're free to control your phone no matter whether it's in your pocket, on your car dashboard, or wherever else you might have stuffed the damn thing (ahem).

When it works, it works really well and is generally very convenient. For example, just yesterday I lost track of time and was scrambling to pack up my suitcase and meet some friends before heading to the airport. We hadn't picked a restaurant yet. I was able to rush all around the apartment like a chicken with its head cut off, while still receiving text messages and calls and coordinating with my friends. Or two days ago, when I was walking around a new city, I was getting turn-by-turn walking directions piped straight to my ear while looking around and enjoying the scenery.

As for how discreet it is, I wore this thing for three solid days (when I wasn't swimming, showering, or charging it)â€"walking down the street, in stores, at restaurants. I was waiting for someone to ask me about itâ€"daring them, even. But nobody seemed to notice. Not once. Maybe they didn't want to ask me about it because they thought I was deaf in one ear and didn't want to offend, but honestly, I think it's so small that it just barely registers. Then again, I was a bit self-conscious about talking to it when surrounded by people. I'd do it walking down the street, but I'd typically wait until any potential cyborg-hunters were a safe distance away.

It comes with a few different sized gel-attachments to make sure it fits snugly into different-sized ears. I found that the pre-installed medium size was the best fit overall, but even so, after a while it did become a bit uncomfortable in my ear. When this happened I would just pull it out of my one ear and pop it into the other, and that gave my ear the break it wanted and solved the comfort issues. It's not ideal, but it isn't too awkward. Getting it to fit in your ear just right is very important, because if it doesn't really get in there it can be pretty hard to hear.

Actually, that leads me to the first strike against it. In my experience, the Hint has very inconsistent volume levels. Some things it says will be relatively loud and easy to hear, and then for other things it just kind of whispers. Seems like a software issue that could be ironed out. More annoying is when you're trying to issue a voice command and it doesn't seem to be able to hear your voice over its own sounds. It was particularly problematic when I was playing music: I was shouting my key phrase over and over, but it just didn't register. This same thing happens with the Moto X, even playing relatively quiet audiobooks with Audible, so I'm thinking it may be a software issue.

And even at max, the Hint really doesn't pump out as much volume as a traditional Bluetooth headset. I really struggled to hear what it was saying over the sounds of light traffic or even a cranked-up A/C in my car. Pushing it further into your ear helps, but watch out: When you tap the touch-sensitive panel on the back it activates Moto Voice just as if you'd uttered the wake-up command. Or deactivates it just as you were trying to hear whether the Hint had properly interpreted you. Or ends your call, which is a special kind of annoying.

On the positive side, you can start a call on your phone, then simply pop the Hint into your ear and the call will seamlessly transfer to the earbud. Take it out in the middle of a call, and yep, your call is right back on your phone. Pretty slick, but doesn't happen quiiite as fast as you'd want, so you'll miss a few seconds of what the other person is saying while waiting for it to switch over.

There are some other places where improvements need to be made on the software side. For instance, Google is making a push to make Hangouts the default messaging app in Android, but Moto Voice doesn't really integrate with Hangouts yet. That means that if you've already switched over to Hangouts you're left out of a lot of the text messaging goodness, which is one of the banner features. It will beep when you get a new text, but it won't read it to you or say who it's from. You have to say your wake-up phrase and then, "What's new?" and then sometimes it will read it. Annoying.

Also, when sending a text (or an email), you dictate the message, and then it will ask, "Do you want to send this?" but it doesn't read your message back to you. So you have to pull out your phone and make sure it heard you correctly before you confirm, which pretty much defeats the purpose. In general, don't expect too much: Moto Voice (and Google Now/Search for that matter) still has trouble with natural language. You really have to memorize commands in order to get it to do what you want. It's still ahead of Siri in this department but it's way behind Windows' Cortana. We hope Google will up its game very, very soon.

Like

The size is really incredible. The Hint is tiny, discreet, and even when you do notice it, it's a pretty slick little gadget. The charging case is really well-engineered and it looks good, too.

Being able to do a lot with your phone without even having to pull it out is a pretty big deal and there are times when it's genuinely extremely convenient.

No Like

Unpredictable volume levels in the earpiece. It struggles to hear you when there's much ambient noise, and it can't hear you at all when you're listening to music or an audiobook. But don't even bother listening to music with it, because the audio quality isn't great anyhow. Callers generally understood me pretty well, but I struggled to hear them if there was any ambient noise.

Having to take it out of your ear to charge it every three hours or so is kind of annoying, though I appreciated the break.

It needs work understanding natural language.

Because it's basically invisible it makes you feel like a crazy person when you're walking down the street shouting, "Hi there Jenny. HI there Jenny! HI THERE JENNY!!!"

Should You Buy It?

Maybe, but there are some big ifs. If you have a new Moto X, then it's pretty cool how it can leverage Moto Voice. If you're the sort of person who uses (or wants to use) a Bluetooth headset anyway, then the tiny form factor of the Hint could definitely be very appealing. If your job/lifestyle/fetishes could really benefit from being able to interact with your phone without touching it (I don't know, maybe you're a pastry chef and you're constantly covered in flour), then, yeah, maybe. But remember, it costs $150, which is pretty steep for a Bluetooth headset.

For most of us, the Hint is a cool little luxury item. Could it be the first step toward a product that we'll come to think of as a necessity? Actually, I think there's a pretty decent chance of that. It has a lot of forward-thinking ideas, but the software just isn't quite there yet. It feels like a beta. If you're looking to fall in love with a Scarlett Johansson-voiced artificial intelligence â€" or even a Jarvis-like robotic butler â€" you'll need to wait quite a few more years.

http://gizmodo.com/moto-hint-review-the-first-bluetooth-headset-i-wasnt-1645744079