Monday, April 27, 2015

Introducing the Sensear Intrinsically Safe Double Protection Headset

Many of you might not heard of Sensear, they are making big strides in the headset industry, here is their latest offering.

Sensear, a global leader in developing and manufacturing best-in-class digital communication headsets, announced the release today of their new Intrinsically Safe Double Protection Headset (IS-SDP). Based on Sensear's existing SM1xSR IS headset, and incorporating the double protection feature from Sensear's current non-IS double protection headset; the new IS-SDP headset includes an improved boom microphone, and will interface with a variety of two-way radios both cabled and via Bluetooth for wireless operations.  Bluetooth can also be used with IS Smart phones and other IS Bluetooth devices.

The Sensear IS-SDP headset was developed from a marketplace need for a high performance intrinsically safe headset for extreme noise environments that require Class 1 Div 1 certification. Double hearing protection (both ear plugs and ear muffs) is often required when exposures may exceed 95 decibels (dBA) in many critical working areas. At the same time operators in these environments are required to use two-way radios to hear site communications and respond appropriately. Without the use of an appropriate intrinsically safe headset communications on site can potentially be very difficult.



The ear-plugs for the IS-SDP are hard wired to the headset allowing for dual protection, and communications to be directly understood by the operator. The IS-SDP's 31 dB NRR combined with Sensear's patented SENSâ„¢ technology allow operators to protect their hearing at a safe level of 82 dB, communicate effectively between co-workers via two-way radio and Bluetooth and maintain 360-degree awareness.

"We were excited about the development of the IS-SDP the early beginnings of Sensear grew from creating unique solutions for many industrial environments," said Peter Larsson, CEO.  "The IS-SDP continues to show our commitment to developing practical, usable products that solve the communication challenges in heavy industry."

Source - http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/introducing-the-sensear-intrinsically-safe-double-protection-headset-300052146.html

Friday, April 24, 2015

New Device Delivers Sound Through Tongue to Let Deaf People Hear

While we naturally think that we hear with our ears, it is really the brain that converts sound waves into what we perceive as sound. Our most distinctive organ also has a lot of plasticity, being able to adapt its regions to perform tasks normally not assigned to them. Blind people, for example, often have the part of the brain responsible for vision working to more precisely interpret audio and create a better mental picture of what’s around. This principle is what led researchers at Colorado State University to attempt to use the tongue as a medium for passing sound to the brain in deaf people.

The researchers developed a flat shaped neurostimulator with a bunch of electrodes in a grid at one end. It’s connected wirelessly via Bluetooth to an earpiece that captures sound. The system processes the audio signals received by the earpiece and converts them into electrical pulses that are delivered through the stimulator. The user simply presses his tongue against the electrodes on the mouthpiece and feels tingling or vibration. The idea is that this sensation, really sound interpreted another way, can be translated by the brain into perceived audio if given proper training.

There’s much work to be done to prove the technology and make it practical. Currently, the researchers are mapping out the tongue’s nerves and studying how volunteers respond to the electrical stimulation. They’re trying to figure out whether the device will work uniformly for all people or whether it will need to be individually customized. The researchers hope that this technology will become a new option competing with cochlear implants and that it may help overcome hearing loss for a wide variety of people.

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Where Are Sepura Radios Used?

For people who are curious where Sepura radios are used, then this article is for you. Sepura is a highly respected company that designs, manufactures and sells radio technology. However, the company is known for providing accessories, like a Sepura radio earpiece to radio networks. The company has gained a reputation to supply radios that are highly secure, feature-rich and durable. In fact, with these so many features, the only real question is - in which situations do Sepura radio are not suitable? The answer is - hardly. Nevertheless, this article is going to enumerate a few popular uses for Sepura radios.

Public Safety

One of the most common uses for Sepura radios is in the field of public safety. There are plenty of reasons for this, but the most compelling one is because of the Sepura's mobile gateway technology. Because of such technology, officers in public safety will be able to communicate with each other no matter the location, even for "dead spots. Sepura radio also comes with a one-of-a-kind noise suppression technology. It's so good at it that even with wailing sirens, you can still hear crystal clear audio. However, if you really want to block-out all the background noises, then Sepura radio earpiece can help you with that.

Seupra also provides radio technologies that are all designed to streamline and increase the functionality of the communications like allowing real-time information sharing with emergency services, the control room and colleagues; also, Sepura provides apps that make using the technology easier. The ability of Sepura radios to withstand a heavy beating makes them very ideal for tough and disaster scenarios. Lastly Sepura radios come with a Man-Down feature, which provides critical help for any officers that might need backup or assistance.



Oil And Gas

Another popular use for Sepura radios is in oil and gas industries, especially offshore installations. These kinds of work environments are considered as “high risk", thus worker safety of utmost importance. Therefore, accurate and clear communication is crucial for the safety of all the workers. Sepura radios offer the one of the best radio communications and technologies to provide that another safety layer.



The notable safety features are the Lone Worker and Man-Down. These features are especially designed to ensure safety of the workers and provide immediate help if the situation arises. The radios and accessories are designed in a way so that it can be easily operated even if the user is wearing thick gloves. Sepura radios also feature real-time information authorization access to different areas. This helps protect assets and ensure information security. Also, Sepura radios come with an app specially designed for oil and gas environments as it helps in reducing incidents, liability exposure, promoting safety and full audit-trail.

Sepura is a company that designs, manufactures and sells radio and radio based-technologies from handheld devices, networks to accessories, like the Sepura radio earpiece. Because of the many features, their radios are extensively used in different locations, industries and agencies. The company has put a lot of effort to put features that ensure safety and clear communications, thus it has earned a place in public safety and oil and gas industries.

Friday, April 10, 2015

Natural History Museum Replaces Dippy Dinosaur With Blue Whale Skeleton

Directors of the Natural History Museum in London have announced that ‘Dippy’ â€" the famous diplodocus skeleton that greets visitors in the museum’s iconic Hintze Hall â€" will be replaced by the skeleton of a blue whale by 2017.

The idea is to better convey a more modern feel to the museum, one that reflects the cutting-edge science being conducted by the institution.

"Everyone loves 'Dippy', but it's just a copy," NHM director Sir Michael Dixon told BBC News, “what makes this museum special is that we have real objects from the natural world - over 80 million of them - and they enable our scientists and thousands like them from around the world to do real research."

At present, the 25m-long blue whale is hanging â€"in a flat position- in the ‘mammals’ gallery and is accompanied by a life size reconstruction of the animal.

The skeleton was acquired by the museum in 1891 and it originally cost curators £250. The massive animal was beached at Wexford in Southeast Ireland and its remains were immaculately processed and preserved. To date, it is one of the biggest â€" and best-preserved â€" whale skeletons in the world.

Over the coming two years, the entire skeleton will be taken down and each individual bone will be thoroughly cleaned and carefully catalogued before it is re-structured and placed in a dramatic new pose, ready to better symbolize the new science of the 21st century.

The massive remains will be placed in a graceful diving posture designed to impress visitors to the hall.



By virtue of being the largest animal to ever exist on our planet, the blue whale skeleton will likely present an even more impressive sight to behold than Dippy presently does. Its presence could also help to raise awareness for whale conservation and preservation of our natural heritage in general.

The conservation aspect of this move is an especially relevant point, as it was NHM scientists that first demonstrated that hunting of the blue whales needed to be stopped in the first place.

This move, whilst surprising, is not without precedent. In the past, the Hintze Hall has also featured a complete sperm whale skeleton as its main attraction, as well as carefully preserved African elephants â€" and other displays as well.

So where will Dippy be going once his replacement arrives? At present, there is talk about taking the iconic dinosaur on tour in order to bring the Natural History Museum to the people, by housing him in regional museums throughout the UK.

Before that happens though, he will likely still have pride of place in a dinosaur-themed exhibit elsewhere in the museum, so we’ll still be able to stop by and say “hi”..

Tuesday, April 7, 2015

Earpiece comes in handy for hands-free phone

This was originally posted on nwherald.com

The last time I remember being hands free was when I was in high school, riding my bicycle hands free.

No hands on the handlebars while I bicycled with my golf clubs to Green Acres â€" no kidding â€" Country Club in Donnellson, Iowa. My 10-speed was a marvel in balance. It certainly helped that Donnellson was flat and the streets well-paved, as well as completely lacking in traffic.

I could maneuver the mile to the golf course without putting my hands on the handlebars, except to make turns. It probably was dangerous, and police probably would pull me over now for hands-free bicycling.

Why I didn’t crumple up into a pile of bicycle and blood is beyond me. But I had hardly a care in the world when I was biking to the golf course or other points in between. And this was before helmets and the notion of traumatic brain injuries. I was just a kid.

Now, hands free takes on a new meaning in Illinois. It’s not about bicycling; it’s about driving.

And, as of Jan. 1, it is illegal to talk on your cellphone while driving if you are holding it up to your ear. Police can pull you over if they see you and give you a $75 ticket first time out. And if you don’t get it the first time, the second time you are pulled over, the ticket is $100. After four times, you could have your license suspended.

I don’t want a ticket. No call is worth $75. And you would have to be plain dumb to lose your license over cellphones.

I’ve had a cellphone for almost nine years; I think it came inside our wedding cake. For all my life, I had been tied to the landline, only it wasn’t called a landline. It was called a telephone, and it was attached to the wall. And if you wanted to make a call, you were attached to the wall.

I was a latecomer to cellphones. In fact, I was anti-cellphone. If I had a cellphone, it meant that I was connected to the world at all times; there was no getting away from it. Of course, if it rang, you would answer it. No matter where you were. In the living room. In the bathroom. Egad. In the car. There was no escaping the world with a cellphone. I wanted that escape.

But I’ve come to find out that I do not receive a lot of telephone calls. And I do not make a lot of telephone calls. I haven’t done a thorough analysis, but I think most of the telephone calls I receive come from my pharmacy, my friendly pharmacy. Completely computer generated.

My good wife comes in second. We’re really never that far apart to need to call.

But call I do on my way home from my Friday evening appointments, talking all the way from the parking lot to our driveway. I make the call to let her know I’m on my way home, giving her a chance to fire up the oven for the pizza.

And I’ve been doing this with one hand on the steering wheel and one hand to my ear holding the phone. It’s never been a problem. Not even close. It’s like talking to someone in the passenger seat. It’s hardly a distraction.

But it is a distraction, according to Illinois state law. And distractions cause crashes.

So, instead of holding the phone to your ear, you have to use hands-free technology, such as a Blue Tooth device, an earpiece, a headset or a speakerphone. The Blue Tooth is out of the question. People who use those devices look like they have cicadas sucking on their ears. Ugh.

An earpiece came with our cellphones, and that is what I am left to use.

I gave it the first try a couple of weeks ago, and I don’t see how it improves safety over a handheld phone. But greater minds than mine prevail in Illinois.

It took several minutes â€" before I started the car â€" to figure out how to plug the earpiece into the cellphone. Then I had to fairly jam the earpiece into my ear so it wouldn’t fall out or puncture my eardrum, then I made the call to my wife, and then I started the car. By the time I was in reverse, I was talking on the phone hands free.

The call was amazingly clear compared to the last time I tried using an earpiece years ago. I could hear my wife and she could hear me. Amazing.

But I was afraid the earpiece would fall out if I moved my head too quickly, and that’s enough to get into a crash. I am guessing the more I use the earpiece, the more comfortable I will become, and it won’t be long before it is second nature. Just like riding a bike. Hands free.